Industry Reports

Quality Construction Materials By Monier Limited
Quality Construction Materials By Monier Limited
June 23, 2022, 6:28 a.m.
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Industry Reports
If you are looking for building supplies look no further. Monier is the mark of quality in PNG and is the single largest producer, supplier and distributor of construction materials in the country.Having been in operations for over 60 years, Monier's range of products include ready mix concrete, masonry, quarry products, pipes, plastic tanks and construction sand. Make an order today via this simple form: Make an order here We strive to provide quality, cost efficiency, and sustainability in all we do, and our aggregates and production techniques are no exception. Along with a complete product selection, Monier Quarry offers services including product transport delivery, technical support and specialist industry expertise.All specified quarry products are quality controlled to comply with relevant standards and codes, eg. Australian Standards (AS) for concrete and asphalt aggregates and Department of Works (DoW) specifications for roadbase materials and sealing aggregates. Monier Sands produces high quality and consistent sand for all scales of projects, this is achieved by a number of reliable natural river sand deposits in Papua New Guinea and our state of the art sand washing and screening plant. All batches undergo an extensive quality control testing regime, ensuring conforming products for every projects. Monier Sands can also customise our sand products to meet client and project specifications locally in Papua New Guinea and internationally. Engineered designs or special customer requirements can be manufactured as high quality products that can be relied on with confidence.Many of the Monier precast concrete elements are manufactured to customer’s specific engineered designs with Monier managing the process from development of shop drawings, fabrication of moulds, development of mix designs to prestressing and casting. Smaller standard precast products are held in stock allowing “off the shelf” purchases.Monier offers a range of drainage system components to provide cost effective design solutions for the management of stormwater drainage; manholes, box culverts, gully pits etc. The standard range includes all masonry products generally used in construction of residential, commercial and industrial buildings. Monier has the capability to manufacture masonry blocks and pavers with a variety of textured faces in a variety of colours. Monier produces ready-mix concrete normal (N) and special (S) grades to Australian Standards and to engineers’ and designers’ nominated specifications. Our facility offers a 120,000 square metre drycast facility and contains an innovative manufacturing space. The capability of this new facility offers pipe manufacturing diversity and flexibility that are the envy of the industry.Our product-line is made up of a comprehensive range of infrastructure concrete pipe products and is a leader with production techniques and innovation in casting and curing within PNG. Monier Water Solutions has a strong focus and dedication to innovation and quality in HDPE pipe technologies. We also offer a complete range of jointing systems including electrofusion, stub end, backing rings, mechanical compression couplings, accessories and plastic water tanks and septic tanks. In Addition to its outstanding physical characteristics, HDPE is recognized for its minimal impact on the environment. Make an order here
A Guide To Medical Centers In Port Moresby
A Guide To Medical Centers In Port Moresby
June 7, 2022, 5:32 a.m.
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Industry Reports
Papua New Guinea has a relatively low standard of healthcare compared to developed countries. Therefore, medical insurance is essential to ensure access to high-quality private medical facilities. Travellers to PNG should have precautionary vaccinations before entering the country and should seek advice from their GP. PNG is providing COVID-19 vaccinations to residents free of charge; however, supplies are limited, and travellers should ensure they are vaccinated before they arrive.The main general hospital, located at 4-Mile near Boroko, has a dedicated team of doctors and medical professionals but underfunding often results in shortages of medicines, equipment and staff. However, Port Moresby General Hospital is typically the best option for major trauma in a severe emergency. Next to the hospital is St John Ambulance who can provide medical emergency transport without charge.Within the vicinity are two major private hospitals; Pacific International Hospital and Paradise Hospital. They both have accident and emergency units, ambulances and general clinics and offer world-class treatments for a full spectrum of possible issues. However, these services are private and having medical insurance is critical.Hospitals and Medical Clinics in Port MoresbyPort Moresby General Hospital (POMGEN)Location: 3 Mile, Korobosea, Port MoresbyType: Public HospitalSpeciality: GeneralOpening Hours: Monday to Sunday, 24 hoursWebsite: www.pomgen.gov.pg Contact: +675 324 8200Overview: Port Moresby General Hospital is the primary referral and teaching hospital in Papua New Guinea. It is also a centre for AIDS treatment in Papua New Guinea, one of only a few facilities equipped to treat HIV/AIDS. It also houses a hyperbaric recompression chamber for diving emergencies. The hospital is the only hospital in the country to have a CT scanner.Paradise Private HospitalLocation: Taurama Road, 3 Mile, Port MoresbyType: General and Specialist Private HealthcareSpeciality: General and SpecialistOpening Hours: Monday to Sunday, 24 hoursWebsite: www.paradiseprivatehospital.co Contact: +675 325 6022Overview: Paradise Private Hospital is a general and specialist private health care provider with 14 permanent medical professionals and 10 visiting specialists providing locum services to cover 24-hour operations. The hospital is a modern 40-bed facility and has Obstetric, Surgical, Pediatric and Adult medical care facilities with 9 doctors’ consulting rooms, Laboratory, X-ray, Ultrasound Scan Imaging Services and a Pharmacy.Pacific International HospitalLocation: Taurama Road, 3 Mile, Port MoresbyType: General and Specialist Private HealthcareSpeciality: General and SpecialistOpening Hours: Monday to Sunday, 24 hoursWebsite: www.pihpng.com Contact: +675 7998 8000Overview: Established in 1997 as PNG Diagnostic Centre, PIH has become the largest private hospital in PNG, offering expertise in more than 20 clinical specialities.2K Medical ClinicLocation: Tutua Avenue, Angau Drive, Port MoresbyType: ClinicSpeciality: SpecialistOpening Hours: Monday to Sunday, 24 hoursWebsite: www.2kmed.com Contact: 323 7730Overview: 2K Medical Clinic provides 24-hour medical service. Family and internal medicine, children's diseases, emergency, laboratory and x-ray examinations.Aspen Medical Harbour CityLocation: Sir Hubert Murray Stadium, KonedobuType: General and Specialist Private HealthcareSpeciality: General and Specialist Opening Hours: Mon - Fri 8:30am - 5:30pm, Sat 9am - 1pmWebsite: www.pihpng.com Contact: +675 321 0202 / 7459 7209Overview: Aspen Medical is an Australian-owned, multi-award-winning, global provider of healthcare solutions. City Specialists Medical Centre (CSMC)Location: Soare Street, Gordons, Port MoresbyType: General HealthcareSpeciality: General and Specialist Opening Hours: Monday to Sunday, 24 hoursWebsite: www.facebook.com/CitySpecialistsMedicalCentre Contact: +675 7633 0580Overview: CSMC offers General and Specialist  Consultation services. Areas of specialisation include Internal Medicine, Cardiac Care, General and Cardiothoracic Surgery, Orthopaedic surgery, Obstetric and Gynaecology, Paediatrics, ENT (Ear, Nose, Throat) Surgery, Molecular Genetics (DNA Tests), Dermatology, Haematology and Pathology and Pain Medicine.Hospitals and Clinics in LaeAngua Memorial Provincial HospitalLocation: Markham Road, LaeType: Public HospitalSpeciality: General Opening Hours: Monday to Sunday, 24 hoursContact: +675 473 2100Overview: Angau Memorial Provincial Hospital is the main public hospital in Lae and the referral hospital of the Momase region.Lae International HospitalLocation: Marsina Street, LaeType: Private HospitalSpeciality: General and Emergency Healthcare Opening Hours: Monday to Sunday, 24 hoursContact: +675 472 7133 / 7190 2306Overview: LIH is the main private hospital in Lae with a 24 hour accident and emergency department, surgery, radiology, pediatrics and dental careMedical emergencies in PNGMost hospitals in PNG have an accident and emergency unit for emergencies, and St John Ambulance provides first aid and pre-hospital treatments. Call 111 in case of an emergencyFor the most severe emergencies, there are Medevac services that will evacuate patients to an Australian hospital. Travellers should check that their insurance covers this service.
Results of Papua New Guinea’s 2018 Real Estate Survey Released
Results of Papua New Guinea’s 2018 Real Estate Survey Released
June 20, 2022, 6:01 a.m.
Industry Reports
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The 2018 edition of the Papua New Guinea Real Estate Survey, conducted by Hausples.com.pg, has been released and can be downloaded by clicking on the link below. CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD FREE Hausples launched the first PNG real estate consumer sentiment survey in 2017 after identifying a lack of information about consumer preferences on various aspects of the real estate industry. The 2018 edition of the survey provides more in-depth insights about the current state of the PNG real estate sector; such as demand in specific suburbs, market buying power, and an analysis of changes in trends since the 2017 survey. Similar to the preceding survey, the 2018 questionnaire was distributed electronically to the Hausples.com.pg database and social network followers, resulting in over 2,000 respondents over a three week period in February 2018. The interviewees were predominantly Papua New Guineans, with minority representations from Australian, Chinese, Malaysian and American nationals.Whilst some of the results in 2018 were in line with those registered in 2017, the overall population’s sentiment toward buying versus renting a home has changed somewhat - providing an interesting overview about this years general needs. Indications show a significant increase in middle-income earners across the market, indicating a positive forecast for property sales yet with a general inclination to spend more time looking for a property before committing to the purchase.With respect to housing preferences and purchasing power, the 2018 survey has focused on  providing more in-depth insights about the local market. For example, high-set housing, particularly in independant allotments or as part of a new development, are in the greatest demand. Comparatively, there is an increase in demand in the affordable segment of the market; with more people willing to spend between K200,000 and K400,000 on purchasing a property.When it comes to the rental sector, participants perceived it as costly but still more affordable compared to purchasing a property. In line with last year’s results, demand for good quality but affordable rental accommodation remains high, specifically in popular areas of Port Moresby such as Boroko and Waigani, which respondents rated as the most preferable areas to rent or buy a property. CEO of Hausples, Mr. Mathew Care,recognizes that, “This year’s survey results indicate an unchanged willingness to purchase properties in highly sought after areas of Port Moresby such as Boroko and Waigani; but also a longer time frame before committing to a purchase.”  He also added, “We believe that property seekers need a longer time period to find their dream property and secure finance. This is understandable considering the average cost of housing in PNG remains very high”.Care added that, “The 2018 PNG Real Estate Survey, together with the revamped Hausples.com.pg website, provides an opportunity for those involved in the real estate sector to plan and create opportunities for quality and affordable housing options for Papua New Guineans. We therefore encourage everyone to download the full report”.The survey also explores financial and insurance literacy, providing results on how people feel about obtaining a home loan or insuring their property. Understanding how superannuation can be used as equity, for example, or accessing First Home Ownership Scheme Loans, is now becoming common knowledge thanks to events such as the PNG Real Estate Show.Mr Tom Snelling, the General Manager of Hausples, has specified, “Hausples was founded in 2013 with a vision to provide comprehensive and easy to access, one-stop-shop for consumers and providers alike. With the 2018 PNG Real Estate Survey we aim to provide the real estate industry with up to date and in-depth data which can be used by agencies, developers and banks to improve their services and to give the general public an outlook about the current state of the market.”There will be further opportunity for queries or suggestions regarding future surveys during the second annual Hausples Real Estate Show at the Sir John Guise Indoor Complex on Friday 1st and Saturday 2nd of June 2018 - where copies of the survey will be made available to the public.You can download your FREE copy by clicking the button below.  CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD FREE
Heartbeat of Port Moresby’s small business
Heartbeat of Port Moresby’s small business
June 20, 2022, 6:02 a.m.
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Industry Reports
Tucked away in the corner of Hohola in the National Capital District is a warehouse that is host to a hive of activity. You will not miss the yellow and green painted walls of the National Development Bank (NDB) Business Incubation Centre on Kunai Street, which opened its doors in July last year to Port Moresby’s small and medium-size enterprise.At its peak the center was home to 40 SME that offered everything from catering services, trekking tours, graphic design, hair saloon, tailoring and gifts to herbal therapy and alternative medicine. It opened three months after the O’Neill Government launched its SME Policy 2016, which provides the framework to support and grow PNG’s SME sector, and over the long-term period create employment opportunities for citizens and enable them to participate in business activity.While the center and its tenants have had their challenges since the opening last year, its one-stop-shop location on Kunai Street and along Waigani Drive has not been lost on them.“We mainly sell electronic stuff besides stationery and we like the location of the center, it is a good location,” says MacDonald Magari, whose family-run kiosk sells electronic accessories and locally-made gifts.Lisa Magung’s first foray into business began in floricultural, which she ran out of her Waigani home in the national capital and later expanded to include a gift shop at the NDB center.When asked how business is doing she said: “I am starting small by opening up a gift shop and I come here every day. With Valentine’s Day coming up people could be looking for gifts to buy for their loved ones so we have jewelry here, hand watches and purse for girlfriends or wallets for boyfriends!”But it is not all about jewelry, fashion and gifts buying at the center, which the NDB hopes will be the catalyst for ordinary Papua New Guineans to get into business. Local company Buna Treks & Tours, in kiosk 3, sells authentic tapa cloth from the Oro Province and offers tours of the Kokoda Track and PNG’s highest peak, Mount Wilhelm.Regina Baiwo, who attends to customer queries at the shop, said members of the public or tourists keen on trekking two of PNG’s iconic spots can make queries there. Buna Treks & Tours has a commercial track operators license for Kokoda and is registered with the PNG Investment Promotion Authority.Nialyn Karpo, the center’s supervisor, says they currently have 38 kiosk owners who open 8 am to 5 pm Sunday to Sunday. The SME owners pay monthly rentals which are determined by the size of their shops. The fees range from K913 (excluding GST) to K3200 for the large-size kiosks.
Capitalize on economic boom, says think tank
Capitalize on economic boom, says think tank
June 20, 2022, 6:02 a.m.
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Image from: pngnri.orgThe National Research Institute (NRI) has recommended that more houses should be built with trunk infrastructure before the start of a major development project.The government and donor-funded think tank also said there should be more effort by the State to unlock customary land for development, if house prices in the National Capital District and other major centers are to be stabilized.The recommendations are part of a research paper titled “Potential impacts of development projects on house sales and rent prices must be considered before implementation in Papua New Guinea”, which the institute commissioned recently. The paper was written by Associate Professor Eugene Ezebilo, who heads the institute’s property sector development and research program.Looking at the PNG Liquefied Natural Gas Project (PNG LNG) and its impact on house sales and rent prices in Port Moresby, the NRI study concluded that house sales and rent prices dropped at the end of the PNG LNG Project’s construction phase, but the cost of the properties were still beyond the reach of most city residents. However, these issues, according to the NRI study, could be addressed if more houses are built before the start of a major development project.“To stabilize house prices, it is necessary to construct more houses, preferably five years before the commencement of the development project. The construction of houses should be accompanied with the establishment of trunk infrastructure and services,” stated the NRI study.The exhausting of State-owned land for commercial development and increasing accessibility to customary land was also highlighted, with the NRI paper suggesting that a previous recommendation for Section 10 of the PNG Land Act 1996 to be invoked be revisited by those in authority.“This involves landowners leasing their land to the state through urban development lease (UDL), which will be processed by the Department of Lands and Physical Planning (DLPP) and without advertising the UDL, the landowners are issued customary land titles. This is a ‘win-win’ situation for the landowner, investor and the state in the development of customary land.”The Papua LNG in the Gulf of Papua is the next major project for PNG. It is led by French energy giant Total with its 40.13% stake and is reportedly set to enter the Front End Engineering Design (FEED) and Final Investment Decision (FID) stages this year.
2018 survey on PNG real estate now underway
2018 survey on PNG real estate now underway
June 20, 2022, 6:02 a.m.
Industry Reports
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The 2018 PNG Real Estate Survey has now commenced and public is invited to share their views about PNG’s real estate industry by visiting: www.hausples.com.pg/survey.  The inaugural survey was launched last year (2017) by Hausples.com.pg and revealed important information regarding real estate industry trends, areas of demand and future market predictions.Hausples General Manager Tom Snelling said the feedback from last year’s survey was encouraging and bodes well for the real estate and financial services sectors, as well as the PNG economy more broadly.“Though prices were perceived as high in 2017, the majority of respondents felt that it was a good time to make a property purchase. Conversely, 13.07 per cent of people believed it was a better time to selling a home.” he said.“We are very curious to understand what people perceive now compared to when they completed survey in 2017.” stated the Hausples GM Tom Snelling. The 2017 survey also revealed that many working-class Papua New Guineans are, or intend to, invest in their own properties.Mr Snelling said: “Despite the long time prevalence of customary land ownership (stretching back to the pre-colonial era), working class Papua New Guineans are beginning to understand the value that homeownership brings to their families and they are increasingly investing in their own properties.”Property prices, security and close proximity to public transport and services continued to play a big part in influencing the decisions of prospective buyers.But these factors did not dissuade a majority of the respondents, who declared plans to spend approximately half a million PNG Kina on a property.  The 2018 PNG Real Estate Survey is fully digital and only takes 5-7 minutes to complete. All participants who provide an email address will be sent copies of the 2018 Report.To make things even more exciting, participants will also have the chance to win a Samsung Phone or an equivalent worth K1000!Complete the survey now by visiting https://www.hausples.com.pg/survey/
The Real Estate Market 2018: What Can We Expect?
The Real Estate Market 2018: What Can We Expect?
June 20, 2022, 6:02 a.m.
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The real estate market in PNG is largely determined by the laws of supply and demand and thus makes it increasingly difficult to forecast. Hausples recently had the opportunity to speak to some of the best in the business on what to expect in 2018. Q. HOW DO YOU SEE THE MARKET PERFORMING GENERALLY IN 2018?“Generally, I'd say it’s going to continue to weaken. There is still considerable downward pressure on rents across the market. Some areas are performing better than others, the lower end remains fairly strong and has not seen the large fall in rent that has occurred in the higher end of the market. There is still considerable downward pressure on rents for mid-range properties.”Ken Richardson Managing Director, Strickland Real Estate  “We're starting into a consolidation stage after our downturn; where that actually ends is anybody's guess, but some sectors are doing quite well and there's demand for certain types of property and others are still declining. So, it’s a mixed bag but generally I think we're entering into a consolidation stage.”Greg Peck General Manager, BCMS “I think this year it's going to be a more challenging year and it will be a buyer's market. We're seeing property prices decline and the rental markets have definitely slowed down. I think it's going to be a challenging year for property owners and for those trying to offload.”Agi DokoManaging Director, Professionals  “I see the real estate growing slowly and moving in the right direction in 2018. Both for house sales and rental.”David MackenzieBusiness Development Manager, Rhodes Projects HOW DO YOU SEE THE EXPAT MARKET? WILL PRICES GO UP OR DOWN?“Broadly down. Surprisingly, most of our high-end properties, those over the K4,500 mark are nearly full, so there's obviously still demand at the higher end but prices are down from what they were a few years ago. I think you can say the general expat rental market is seeing rentals fall.Employers are seeking to save costs and reducing rental allowances is an obvious area, this then leads to further downward pressure on prices.”If landlords have a property that doesn't have a differentiation in terms of good sea views, facilities or size, older apartments in need of work are the ones that are really going to be struggling to maintain a reasonable rental return, whereas newer ones are probably going to be a little more in demand.”  “Definitely down - there's no two ways about it. As you know there's a comeback in some cases by more than 2%. It depends on what happens on the resource side where the expat market is generally reflective of any major forthcoming developments. Again, the consolidation stage that we are in has taken the initial downturn. It is on a slower trajectory now than it has been, so I don’t see a lot more expats coming into town but after APEC, who knows? There's going to be a lot more interest in the country so we're hopeful that that might stimulate demand for more of the expat type houses.” “The rents have definitely come down, especially in the high-end market and I think they may continue to decline because there's not enough tenants out there.” “Towards the end of this year, as numbers of expats come into the country in preparation for some major construction projects and the APEC summit, it is likely that the rental market will increase. This happened in the last property boom in POM and since then there has not been a great deal of additional housing constructed for the market.” HOW DO YOU SEE THE AFFORDABLE MARKET PERFORMING? WILL PRICES RISE AND DO YOU SEE DEMAND INCREASING?“From an affordable housing point of view, once some of the issues around land availability are resolved, I would think that at the lower end of the market there's room for prices to come down. But I think that's dependent on developers using new building techniques and building more PNG appropriate housing. Some of these new estates, where they are building row upon row of stilted houses, in the long term, they're not going to appeal to Papua New Guineans. New estates need to be a little bit more 'village focused' and feature more open spaces and communal areas.  I think that there needs to be different thinking about what affordable housing actually is, and not just creating these huge estates.” “It's pretty exciting that its now centre stage and there's a lot more thought being given to that and, as you know, building a high-rise tower is probably the best option at the moment to accommodate affordability. The traditional style housing is one that is favoured by most Papua New Guineans so it's going to take a while to convince people that perhaps they should be looking at vertical housing rather than horizontal. They are more affordable. Say if you’ve got a foot-print of a thousand square meters and generally that’s one or two houses there, but on 1000 square meters you can put a 15-storey tower that could accommodate 80 or more families. I think it’s just a slow, educational process because the market is still maturing to get out in the field and say, ‘Traditional houses are going to cost you anywhere between K500,000 to K1 mil whereas you can get an apartment for an odd K400,000.”   “There's a big demand for affordable housing but I think there's still a lack of supply. There's a big market for anything between K320,000 to K350,000. I just don't think we have sufficient products for a lot of Papua New Guineans within that price bracket and it could be a case of whether there's sufficient land available.  “We know the demand is there, doing the Hausples Show last year proved that. We, at Rhodes, have an affordable quality product and we hear that all the time. The issues people face here are obtaining land to build and banks approving loans. However, both the banks and the Government have realised this and have started to act.”  WHAT DO YOU BELIEVE WILL HAPPEN WHEN WE HEAD INTO 2019?“It’s really difficult to make a generalization across the real estate market. There will still be reasonable demand by people purchasing a home to live in and as a general rule, established residential areas like Boroko and Korobosea have seen prices remain reasonably firm. Broadly across the rental market, I anticipate 2019 being a tough year. To a certain extent, in 2018, the market is being propped up by expenditure on preparing for APEC and the subsequent flow into the economy.Once the committed expenditure for delivering APEC has gone, the government is likely to tighten up and that's going to leave a big hole in terms of the monetary injection into the Port Moresby economy. I think that will flow on very, very quickly through the market and lead to a further downturn in demand and put downward pressure on rentals. I’m reasonably confident we will get through 2018 and have a fairly good year, however I'm not seeing anything that's giving me any confidence in the short term. Over the medium term I can see it starting to bounce back. I think 2019 is going be a tough year.”  “It's very interesting, I think we'll get a spike around APEC obviously for activity around housing and accommodation and projecting forward to 2019, again I think we're very dependent on the resource sector and major developments coming to town to bring an influx of people in. The demand may pick up in 2019, as I said originally, I think the consolidation phase has started, there will still be some downward trajectory on pricing and that's a good thing for the general public because the housing is extremely expensive so I see that as being a positive note for people that are looking for housing. On the same token its very short sighted to go for something that's cheap because quality is a big concern here.”  “We're hoping in 2019 things will pick up again come the Papua LNG. This year is definitely a challenging year but we're hoping in 2019 things will turn around and pick up again.” “Standards of houses should improve. People are becoming better educated about housing and materials used in building them. They are asking questions all the time. Builders and suppliers will have to raise their game if they want to stay in the industry.” ANY OTHER COMMENTS? “We've still got sellers expecting that they're going to get prices they may have gotten three or four years ago. They are basing the value of property on the rents that they might have been getting at the height of the market. There are quite a few active purchasers in the market at the moment, however the vendor's pricing expectations far exceed what buyers are prepared to pay.”  “There seems to be no entry level or barrier for anybody to act as an agent. When you're dealing with somebody's biggest asset in their lifetime, I think there should be checks and balances on who can actually practise in that sector. There are a lot of sales agents out there who are really uneducated in terms on the protocols that need to be in place, so it's a big issue. At some stage I think it will be addressed and I hope to be part of that.”   “For the people who are cashed out, you might be able to pick up properties where people are forced to sell.There's a big need for more affordable housing and it's something the Government really needs to address.” “An increase in the rental market will have a knock-on effect. Companies have to look elsewhere to accommodate staff. For example, we have just completed a project at Koki for Nambawan Super for their staff housing, and we can see more of these types of projects happening. Keeping staff happy with quality housing keeps them happy at the company that provides it.”
PNG Properties for Sale
PNG Properties for Sale
June 20, 2022, 6:02 a.m.
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If you are considering PNG properties for sale, www.hausples.com.pg lists more homes, land and commercial real estate for sale than any other website! About the PNG property marketPNG’s real estate market is unique in that that vast majority of PNG land is customarily owned (estimated to be upwards of 85%) and 80% of the countries 7 million citizens live in rural and remote areas. For this reason, the png properties for sale are generally limited to the major commercial centres of Port Moresby, Lae, Mount Hagen, Madang and Goroka.To compound PNG’s limited supply of freehold land, the real estate market has been through a boom over the past 10 years due in large part to a range of high profile infrastructure projects such as the Exxon Mobile PNG LNG project. Whilst price rises have been excellent for investors, PNG’s housing affordability has been at an all time low and this has made it very difficult for the average Papua New Guinean to afford a house, or even a cheaper style home such as an apartment or bedsit.Thankfully, the construction of a number of projects are coming to an end in 2014 and this has caused the property market, especially the rental market, to retract significantly from the high’s of 2012 and 2013. In addition, the PNG Government have introduced a range of new initiatives aimed at making it easier for people to purchase PNG properties for sale. One such scheme is the BSP / PNG Government’s First Home Ownership Loan Scheme which provides loans to homebuyers at a preferential interest rate of 4%.Please visit our dedicated page for more detailed information about Port Moresby real estate and market predictions for 2015. How Hausples.com.pg will helphe Hausples real estate portal is PNG’s No 1 real estate website, with more than 1,000 PNG properties listed for sale and rent, and this number is growing daily. Our website is free for any PNG real estate agent or property developer to list a property, and it is absolutely free for the public to use.We aim to make it easy to search for land, homes and commercial properties for sale through a simple web-design that is mobile phone and tablet friendly. You can also save your favourite png properties for sale and create email alerts to advise you when new homes for sale are listed on Hausples.com.pg.Finally, we are helping to make PNG’s property market more transparent by providing sold prices for PNG properties and providing an easily searchable database of available properties for sale and rent.
The Ultimate Guide to Gordons
The Ultimate Guide to Gordons
June 20, 2022, 6:02 a.m.
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Gordons OverviewThe Gordons suburb of Port Moresby spans across various kilometers bordering other suburbs such as 5 mile and Waigani. The Gordons area is divided into Gordons and Gordons 5, each comprising of their own within the vicinity of major amenities. Gordons ResidentialPropertyThe residential area of Gordons is largely located along Henao Drive, which boasts a variety of accommodation from stand alone homes to blocks of units, to lodges and hotels. The majority being stand alone homes built to the traditional PNG style homes which has attracted many Papua New Guinean families to live there.The security factor involved along Gordons is not very high as many of the residents are families whom are notCommercial properties are also present in Gordons with buildings such as the recently built CHM Corporate Office and the Datec Compound housing some of the biggest companies in Port Moresby. Other office spaces are also available for the smaller business in buildings such as Copy-Tek Ples. SchoolsThe Ela Murray International School (TEMIS) and the Gordons International School are run by the International Education Agency (IEA) international standards of education for children up the 8th Grade. In addition to those, there is the Sunny Bunny Preschool located next door to TEMIS. Shopping & DiningThe Boroko Foodworld at Gordons is located less than 3 minutes away from all ends of Gordons, a popular grocery shop for expats and locals alike offering largely Western style foods as well as the Poppy’s Cafe. Less than half a kilometer away is the RH Hypermarket, also very popular for the locals and expats alike but provides more food for the asian cuisine.For those looking for locally grown produce, the Gordons Market is the market for buying fresh vegetables in bulk, for a very cheap price. Gordons Market however is also the location of the Gordon’s Bus Stop, bringing hundreds of commuters together at one time and has had issues with petty theft across the years. For a safer alternative, the H-hill Open Market is located across the road from TEMIS and amongst the residential properties. Here you will have access to both local produce as well as a variety of seafood.  Located in Gordons are various dining establishments mostly offering the asian cuisine such as Maggie’s Seafood Restaurant, Phoenix Restaurant, Regal Bar & Grill, Kiwa Korean Restaurant and the Brown Beans Cafe.Within Gordons, various other shops are available to find a variety of items that would be much too long to mention in this profile. Popular stores however, include the Brian Bell Home Centre, BNBM Home Centre and Courts. Furthermore, buildings in the area include South Pacific Brewery, Datec, the Air Niugini Head Office and A number of hardware stores can also be accessed in the area such as Plumbers & Builders and Agmark Hardware. NightlifeThere are a number of establishments that provide a place for an evening drink. Most notably is the Armani Club, Diamond Club and Club 22 in Gordons. Although these places are popular amongst locals, they are not highly recommended given the factor of security. Although all hope is not lost as Gordons borders Waigani and other establishments such as the Gekko Bar at Holiday, Lamana Gold Club and the Cosmopolitan are within 5 minutes driving distance. Basic ServicesThe Eda Ranu Head Office, the State Owned Entity responsible for supplying water to all residences in Port Moresby as well as other urban centres in PNG.Gordons Police Station is also located next to the Gordons Market, where people can go if need be; or they can be contacted on their emergency number 000. Gordons IndustrialLocated within the Gordon is an area known by the locals as ‘Gordon’s Industrial’ Located on the south side of the Poreporena Freeway, this area, as the name suggests, is where many of the industrial dealers may be found. Here you can find vehicle workshops such as Pit-Stop, Dunlop Tyre Services, ARB and other service centres such as the Brian Bell Service Center and ESCO.All within walking distance of one another, you can also find a Bank South Pacific branch with ATM access. A 2 minute walk away is the head office for Hitron, one of the major television network providers in PNG.If you’re looking to dine while you’re in the area, a Duffy’s Cafe is located right next to the Hitron office. For something more heavy, there are restaurants in the area such as the Imperial Chinese and Ang’s.
The Ultimate Guide to Gabutu
The Ultimate Guide to Gabutu
June 22, 2022, 12:51 a.m.
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OverviewThe suburb of Gabutu is located on the coast in the south of Port Moresby overlooking Walter Bay and Manubada Island with the Coral Sea in the back.It is a scenic part of the PNG capital and was in the colonial days a location of choice for mixed-race families. Konebada Beach on the waterfront is frequented by residents while Manubada Island just off the coast of Gabutu is a popular picnic spot for city residents.The suburb is predominantly residential except for Karius Road where a few local businesses have their premises. The road also provides sole access for drivers to the Taikone and Vabukori villages.   HistoryGabutu was – prior to the arrival of the British colonial administration – a fishing area for Korobosea and later Kirakira villagers.Manubada Island just of the coast of Gabutu used to be a gardening area for its traditional owners. The reefs close to the island were also a fishing ground for the Vabukori and Pari villagers.Gabutu, Koki and Badili were the three Port Moresby suburbs with the largest number of resident mixed-race families in the pre and post-independence PNG. Today third to fourth generation mixed-raced families with European and Filipino ancestry still call Gabutu home. Office spaceGabutu is primarily a residential area with just one pocket of the suburb allocated to the churches (Catholic Church, Church of Latter Day Saints and the Assembly of God) and a small business center that houses the offices of local business Patrick’s Transport and Patrick’s Cellars. The Don Bosco Technical School is within the premises of the local Catholic Church. ResidentialThe association of Gabutu with mixed-race families is epitomized in the size and quality of the architectural design in a lot of the properties found here. A number of these properties were renovated by the owners and are today on the rental market. In 2015 the National Housing Estate Limited (NHEL) – the business arm of the National Government’s National Housing Corporation (NHC) – signed an agreement with Korea Palace Construction Ltd and Korea Niugini Housing Ltd to embark on a K2.17 billion mixed-use land development project in Gabutu. The public-private-partnership project will see the construction of ten 15-storey apartment blocks overlooking Konebada beach in Gabutu and is a project supported by the O’Neill government. SchoolsThe Don Bosco Technical School is the only education institution that is resident in Gabutu. Other schools within the vicinity of the suburb are Kilakila Secondary School, Kilakila Primary School and the Sevese Morea Primary School at Vabukori. HealthcareThe nearest health facility is the Four Square Church-run Kaugere Clinic in Kaugere, a 10-minute drive from Gabutu. The Port Moresby General Hospital (PMGH), Pacific International Hospital (PIH) and other private clinics are a 15 to 20-minute drive at Three Mile. TransportAccess to Gabutu is through public transport (Bus Route 22) from Koki and Bus Route 10 from Manu Autoport (East Boroko). Government emergency The nearest police station is located at Badili while the PNG Fire Service station at Four Mile (Boroko commercial area) and Town can attend to emergencies at Gabutu.
untimate guide to waigani
The Ultimate Guide to Waigani
June 22, 2022, 12:55 a.m.
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Waigani Suburb, or colloquially referred to as Waga, is centrally located between the Tokarara, Ensisi, Gordons and Gerehu suburbs, and sits ideally northwest of downtown Port Moresby and southwest of Jackson’s International Airport.  As one of the largest and most iconic suburbs in Port Moresby, Waigani is home to several historical landmarks such as the National Parliament, National Museum, the National Library, Port Moresby’s National Arts Theatre, National Archives, Morauta Haus, and the newly refurbished City Hall.The sharp number of the population living in Waigani can be a pro or a con depending on your experience of the area. But one cannot deny the fact that since 2018’s APEC Summit, Waigani has experienced a boom in infrastructure development, thanks to the likes of: The Independence Boulevard; The Convention Center; Koura Way (connecting both Waigani and Hanuabada via Tokarara and June Valley); and,Keni Vani Road (links Gerehu and Rainbow with 8 and 9 mile); and,The Sir Manasupe Haus (formerly Pineapple Building) 1. Witness the nation's monumental eventsNot only is it one of the largest suburbs in the country but Waigani also has the most national and cultural attractions in it. The National Parliament, the National Museum, the Prime Minister's official residence, the Port Moresby National Arts Theatre, the National Library, National Archives, the PNG National Court, Morauta Haus (office of the Prime Minister of PNG) and the city’s only golf course - the Royal Port Moresby Golf Course are all within a five minute drive of each other, essentially sharing fences with each other.2. AffordabilityIn the main, Waigani is home to a variety of property types to suit different needs and wallet sizes. From bedsitters to executive apartments, there is no doubt you will find what you are looking for in terms of price and quality affordable real estate. Prices range from as low as K600 (approximately AUD$208) through to K10,000 (AUD$3,458) per week. 3. AccessibilityBy accessibility we mean in the terms of access to conveniences, ease to move from that suburb to another, and road condition. Waigani had recently seen upgrades of roads and new access roads afford residents the ability to quickly move from Waigani to other suburbs. Like Boroko, Waigani allows ease of access to many conveniences: schools, groceries, a police station, postal services, four banks, service stations; pharmacies and other health services; and there are more churches in this suburb than Boroko.4.VersatilityBedsitter, luxurious hotel, town house, church, market or an international sporting event - Waigani is as versatile a neighbourhood as they come. The suburb has a wide range of educational facilities initiated by private enterprises, churches and public institutions, with an array of subjects and teaching skills to suit. There’s lots to do at Waigani, for instance sports and entertainment; whether you’re an artist, an athlete, or a gaming nerd, there’s an active spot for your ingenuity to come alive. If there is one suburb that truly has it all, it is definitely Waigani.5.SecurityIn the early 90s, Waigani shared boundaries with two other suburbs (Morata and Gerehu Stage 6) that were notorious for holds up and robberies. Modernization and a steady stream of education and employment opportunities gradually rewrote the collective attitude of the majority of inhabitants, thus, turning both suburbs into livable areas just like any other.6. Aesthetic appealWaigani has many monuments that are found strategic points throughout the area, some in the form of infrastructure. There are structures that are graceful, symmetric and simply marvels of modern architecture; then there are those that are utilitarian with carefully landscaped flower beds. For the most part, Waigani has many mango and raintrees that sufficiently afford shades  and beautify residential areas.7.Waigani MarketWaigani Market is one of only 3 markets in the nation’s capital that is normally active between 8am and 6pm, daily. If you are looking for cheap, organically grown fresh fruit and vegetables in a secure location (the police station is right next to the market), then look no further than Waigani market.8. The biggest shows happen hereShow us a venue that can cater to a variety of sports and entertainment activities, and I’ll show you one that triples the effort. Yes, Sir John Guise stadium deserves a second mention, because of its location and its multi-purpose capacity. The Sir Guise stadium is usually the ideal venue for major events such as local trade shows, international sporting events, and live entertainments. The Real Estate shows from 2017 to 2019 utilized the stadium’s multi-purpose indoor complex and immediate outdoor space to that effect. Not too far down from the stadium are the  Australian High Commission, Japanese Embassy, and the iconic Sir Manasupe Zurenuoc Building, formerly Pineapple Building. All these factors make Waigani one of two of the most sought after suburbs to live in Port Moresby.
PNG Land Titles in PNG Explained:  How Freehold, Leasehold and Customary Land Works
PNG Land Titles in PNG Explained: How Freehold, Leasehold and Customary Land Works
June 22, 2022, 12:56 a.m.
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The nature of land ownership is almost generic in many countries around the world; that is land held under freehold and leasehold. In Papua New Guinea’s case, a form of land ownership will come under either one of these two forms as well as customary land ownership. Our strong traditional connection to the land, calls for us to understand these forms of land ownership; in particular the rights, regulations and possibilities associated with them.Hausples had the opportunity to sit with Mr Benedict Batata, Commissioner for the Land Titles Commission and Mr Aquila Sampson, Acting Commissioner for the National Lands Commission to shed some light on this essential area of the [real estate market]. History of Land Titles in Papua New GuineaTaking a two hundred-year-or-so step back in our history, the traditional land owners in this country had their own mechanisms in place to deal with the issue of land ownership. These processes were aimed at mediating peace and finding a compromise between warring tribes – this same spirit we see now entrenched in our land mediation processes.The period of time which followed saw the arrival of the British Colonisers in Papua who brought along their system of land ownership used today – freehold and leaseholds, whilst recognizing traditional forms of ownership in the land by the native population. The land acquired by the colonizers were used for a variety of purposes, most commonly large plantations apparent in the New Guinea Islands.The years leading up to Independence saw the first real indication of how Papua New Guineans wanted their land to be regulated when the Commission of Inquiry into Land Matters Report 1973 suggested that upon independence, all land acquired by foreigners be given back to the traditional land owners, in particular those heavily affected by the issue of land shortages at the time. Those who kept their land at the time of Independence were required by law to have significant development made within 5 years or bear the risk of losing the land.Fast forward to 1996 and the passing of Land Act and its accompanying legislations saw the recognition of and processes to deal with land ownership; through the adopted leasehold and freeholds as well as customary land ownership. What is the Difference Between Freehold and Leasehold Titles?The most significant differences are the ownership of the land and the processes to acquire them. Leasehold Title:Leasehold titles involve a person who owns the land, but gives it to another whom will have ownership over property on the land for a period of time. In PNG, the most common form of leasehold dealing is through a State Lease lasting a maximum of 99 years. Much of ‘alienated’ land belongs to the State. As noted by by the Jones Lang Lasalle: Property Investment Guide 2014,  “97% of land in PNG is held under customary ownership for which there is no recorded title… All other land is alienated land held by the State” These statistics being from a few years ago, the percentage is likely to have increased, thus State Leases will be used as the primary example in understanding leaseholds.Another feature of leasehold titles is that once it has been registered and certified, the validity of the ownership cannot be challenged or defeated.  This feature was adopted when PNG adopted the Torrens Title System of Registration from Australia.In order to acquire a new State Lease administered by the Department of Lands and Physical Planning, the process begins with an allocation of vacant land in accordance with the plans made; that is whether a place is to be sold for residential, commercial or industrial purposes. When the allocation has been done, vacant land gets published in the National Gazette under the heading ‘Land Available for Leasing’. Individuals and companies may then apply for the lease of this land from the State.A lease may be applied for a period not exceeding 99 years and at its expiration the State is allowed, but not obliged to, renew the lease. Applications for State Leases are made to the Land Board which considers them and based on their merit, submits to the Minister for his decision. The Minister has the final say in granting or rejecting an application for a State Lease. In an instance where a lease is granted, the application will be published in the National Gazette under the heading ‘Successful Applicant.’ Freehold Title:Freehold titles indicate that the name of the person or business group on the Certificate of Title (COT) owns both the property and the land upon which it stands. Land which can be converted to freehold is originally customary land and cannot be State Land.Freehold land registration is not as commonly advocated for as the Incorporated Land Groups (ILG’s). ILG’s in comparison to freehold, involve a large number of groups or clans that have come together to register their members and respective customary land under one group. An ILG can then lease this land to businesses (most common mining companies) who operate on their land, in return paying royalties to the members of the ILG.Mr Batata outlined the process for registering a freehold title saying that “Under the Land (Ownership of Freeholds) Act, an application under Section 7 may be made to the Land Title’s Commission accompanied by survey plans of the proposed land. After deliberation, an issued Conversion Order will be given to the Registrar of Title’s (ROT) and they will issue a Certificate of Title.”The Land Title’s Commission, as Mr Batata explained “is responsible for the carrying out of investigations into applications to ensure that all interests in the land are addressed to prevent future disputes. However, if a dispute arises, the Land Title’s Commission has a mechanism in place to hear and settle disputes.” Customary Land:Making up the majority of land in PNG, it is important to take note of customary land which is also termed “unregistered land” because it doesn’t need a certificate to prove its validity. Given the country’s unique legal system which recognizes both customary and common (English) law land rights, the issue of customary land ownership and the specifics of boundaries are determined through the traditional mediation processes used by customary land owners.The option to deal with disputes in the Courts is also available which can be taken up in the Local Land Courts and Provincial Land Courts.Pictured is Eda Tano Haus, Department of Lands and Physical Planning. Located in Waigani. Photo source: ETS Architects What are the Advantages and Disadvantages of Leasehold, Freehold and Customary Land?The advantages and disadvantages for each of these title ownerships are determined by the ‘restrictions’ which are tied to the title. Leasehold Title:State Leases contain one particular restriction, which is the approved purpose specified in the lease of that land. For instance, a car workshop cannot construct their place of business when their title has been leased for the purposes of residential use. This ensures the Physical Planning conditions specified by the Department of Lands and Physical Planning are complied with. Freehold Title:All freeholds titles have “Restrictions” detailed on the back of the Certificate of Title at the time of registration. These restrictions have been specified under Section 26 of the Land (Tenure Conversion) Act prohibiting the title holder from:Transferring or leasing the land for a period longer than 25 years only with the consent of the Land BoardUsing the land as security as a consequence of bankruptcy, insolvency etc.Mr Batata, used the example of using a title as security for a loan and explained that there is a way around these regulations to allow flexibility when using the title. This process is provided for under Section 26A of the Land (Tenure Conversion) Act under which an individual can apply to the Minister to remove the restrictions on the title. The Minister refers such applications to the Land Titles Commission to conduct investigations on the title and ensure that all parties that have legal interest to the title are satisfied, after which the restrictions may be removed. Customary LandCustomary land has the potential to be utilized to benefit many people if handled properly. One way is to register land under as an Incorporated Land Groups (ILG). This, among other things, identified all of the people with an interest in the land. This land can then be leased to businesses to conduct operations on the land and the customary land owners may in return receive royalty payments.Read more about The Benefits of Incorporated Land Owner Groups in PNG .Pictured are members of the registered ILG consisting of the Rokolo Clan in Irupara Village, Central Province. Photo source: Department of Lands and Physical Planning Other Views on Leaseholds and Freeholds – Restrictions on BorrowingVarious businesses have their own view on how to deal with leaseholds and freeholds for the purpose of their operations. An example given by Mr Batata (and confirmed by a Bank employee that wished to remain anonymous), was that banks do not generally recognize Freehold titles of property when considering loan applications. Despite there being a process available to remove the restrictions on Freehold titles, the banks would be more likely to entertain a Leasehold title of property as valid security for loans. How to Conduct a Papua New Guinea Title SearchMr Sampson of the National Lands Commission of the outlined the following process to conduct a title search:1. Anybody can conduct a title search at the ROT Office by:Going to ROT Office;State that you want to do a title search;Provide volume and folio number;Provide citation to the piece parcel or portion of land i.e. section and allotment numbers as well as the Town;2. Officer locates file with title documents3. Copies of documents are provided to the person conducting the search (if requested), including copy of the original title. The original copy will state the:lease holdertype of leasetenure of the lease (e.g. freehold, business, mission etc.)any other existing registered interest in the lease e.g. alien/mortgage4. Officer will provide a bill/invoice to be paid at the counter before providing an receipt. The fee for conducting a title search K100 for each titles searched plus photocopying fees.Further Information:For more information regarding the Freehold and Leasehold Titles as well as Customary Land Ownership, the Offices below can be contacted on the following:Department of Lands and Physical PlanningFor relevant Office contact information, click on link above.Registrar of TitlesTelephone:            (+675) 301 3246Fax:                        (+675) 301 3299Land Titles CommissionPO Box 815PORT MORESBY, NCDGeneral Enquiries:            323 1927/325 1491Email:                   [email protected]  National Lands CommissionPO Box 591WAIGANI NCDGeneral Enquires: +675 323 1895Fax:                       323 2822Email:                   [email protected]
Understanding Settlements in Urban Centres
Understanding Settlements in Urban Centres
June 22, 2022, 1:03 a.m.
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With the recent new real estate developments occurring in and outside of Port Moresby, it’s easy to disregard another growing phenomenon – settlements. The common conception in people’s minds when they hear of the settlement areas in and around the country’s urban centres are the association with crime, coupled with poor and unsanitary living conditions.Although the reality does consist, to an extent, of these unfavourable features; it is often easily forgotten that settlements are influenced by various factors which have contributed to their establishment, dynamics and growth. How are Settlements Forming?Before dwelling into the more technical elements of understanding settlements, it is important to understand how they come about to begin with. For a number or reasons such as the rural-urban drift, settlements have been known to form by an influx of people to areas through one of two common ways: the illegal occupancy of vacant State land or the selling of traditional land to settlers. This primary acquisition of land is then followed usually by the moving of wantoks to live together. It is for this reason many settlements, particularly in Port Moresby are identified by the dominant ethnic group living in that area. Who Actually Lives in Settlements and Why?The view of settlement residents has been plagued by the picture of a criminals and unemployed vagrants; however, a fact usually ignored is the harsh reality that a large composition of the residents in settlements are working class citizens forced into the settlements for a number of reasons, of particular concern has been the rapid increase in the real estate rental prices experienced around the country.The Government has shared similar concerns with this issue where it was remarked in an article from the National Newspaper by the Minister for Commerce and Industry, Wera Mori, that “Real Estate in PNG and especially in Port Moresby are so expensive, it is beyond the affordability of many public servants, citizens, including MPs like myself.” He further outlined that high dwelling costs and the prevalence of settlements is also apparent in other variurban centres such as Lae, Madang and Rabaul.The Hausples Team had the opportunity to talk with Mr. Moses Wanjik, a resident of the Morata settlement for the past 7 years, where he shared his experiences of living in the settlement. Mr Wanjik works as a carpenter for L&A Construction and has previous employment with Fletcher Morobe Construction, with his qualifications in Carpentry obtained from the Madang Technical College and Australia Pacific Training College (APTC).According to Mr Wanjik, the type of people living in the settlements range from public servants, employees of private companies and small to medium scale entrepreneurs. “These people chose to stay in settlements because they cannot afford the expensive rents in the city. In Morata, there are affordable rooms going at a rate of K200 – K250 per fortnight.” These remarks further emphasise the fact that a large portion of the working class who cannot, as an alternative, live with relatives or afford the current rental prices are forced into settlements. Are Settlements Useful?The roles that settlements play can be seen as useful or otherwise, depending on one’s perspective.For residents like Mr Wanjik, the presence of the settlements has allowed him alongside others to have a roof over their heads instead of ending up on the streets. He also shared that settlements often include amenities such as trade stores and easy access to transport services which eases the burden of traveling into the suburban areas to acquire goods and services.For those who tend to hold the negative view of settlements, it is usually from the understanding of them being used as a hub for criminal activity. This assessment was recently maintained by the Minister for National Planning and Monitoring, Richard Maru in an article by the National Newspaper. Hon. Richard Maru urged the landowners along the highway to refrain from selling portions of their land to settlers and rather invest in beneficial projects saying that “more settlements will bring more social issues to landowners, the Government and investors”.Arguably, it can also be said that the acceptance of the growth of settlements can be seen as ‘unfair’ to those who have purchased homes and land in planned communities such as Edai Town, Heliconia Ridge and Malolo Estate. Individuals in these areas are subject to a number of laws which requires them to pay for services such as electricity and water and the cost of the land itself. On the other hand, settlers have been accused of illegally accessing water and electricity supplies without paying for them because the lack of regulation in those areas.Pictured is the inside of the refurbished Morata clinic, a community project taken by the Bank South Pacific Paramount Staff in June 2017. Photo source: Skerah PNG The Future of SettlementsTo give a clear picture on what the future holds for the growing settlements around the city would be based on speculation. Past events have shown that there are realistically two main avenues which growing settlements can take; further growth or their demolition to make way for [new developments].The potential for further growth is largely determined by the class of people moving into a particular settlement whom are able to invest in the area; the best example of this would be the Morata settlement. On the verge of becoming a fully-fledged suburb, Morata has seen an influx of private individuals, whom have most commonly invested in building large homes and leasing out rooms which has attracted much of the working-class people. In addition to this has been the establishment of services ranging from transport to education such as the Morata Primary School and ClinicThe other extreme is of course the demolition of these places to make way for development, especially where the settlement has been established on State land. The best illustration of this was the demolition of the Erima settlement in 2014 to make way for an expansion of the Hubert Murray highway as well as what is now the Kumul Flyover. Documented in an article by the Post Courier, it was stated that “More than 400 people, including women and children, have been left homeless after 42 homes were smashed down by an excavator”.Sentiments shared by Mr Wanjik was that “[S]ettlements are here to stay… Settlements must be incorporated into urbanisation plans for positive development to take place”. From this point of view, it will be important to keep in mind that working-class people need a place to call home and many settlements are providing this critical service. As urban planners look toward the future of housing in Port Moresby and Papua New Guinea in general, it’s vital to ensure the nations working people are accommodate in a safe and affordable environment. Failure to do so is will only result in poor outcomes for the working class and a necessary consequence a less liveable Papua New Guinea for all.
Raising the Bar on Construction
Raising the Bar on Construction
June 22, 2022, 1:37 a.m.
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Industry Reports
There is a desire when constructing infrastructure in Papua New Guinea to have it be within reasonable costs, together with topnotch materials and output that will last for years. But this has not been the case for the past five years. That’s according to outgoing president of the Papua New Guinea Institute of Engineers, Ila Mari. Image from: Monier PNG FB Page and pnglife.blogspot.comCounting the previous costDuring the 2017 two-day convention on Innovation and Sustainability in Port Moresby last month, Mari raised a few concerns. She mentions, “It is true to say there has been a lot of development happening over the last five years than the last 15 years but at enormous costs.”Mari then proceeds to point out several developments as evidences of her claim.  One of them is the South Pacific Games Facilities that proved costly, and yet had a poor output quality. She also pointed out that the Government buildings rehabilitation have been completed at double the estimated cost. Marin even pointed out that the National Capital Districts roads were designed and constructed at double or triple the estimated cost. Focusing in on present abilitiesMari stated engineers – architects, mechanical, civil, mining, petroleum, and so forth – were all here to make sure that development costs for infrastructure were at a reasonable rate and that they were constructed using high-quality materials.Mari says both innovation and sustainability are crucial for any developmental initiative being implemented within the country. She qualifies, “Thus, it is important to save costs and look at priority areas that would additionally emerge as assets to generate revenue that contributes toward the economy.” She adds, “Engineers are now challenged to have a better look at the current development in order to contribute creatively.” Correcting it for the futureShe also gives a reminder that better usage of assets or resources will conserve time and money in the long run. So, better planning for the construction of road infrastructures and buildings in the country is also essential. She mentions that “with the current leadership, the upcoming engineers should focus on how to go about addressing such developmental issues before taking a step forward.”Mari also urged engineers and construction professionals to develop innovative cost-control systems in various areas in the field to ascertain that the procurement procedures were not abused. She said, “The engineers were encouraged to look ahead to ensure proper material costs and placements be according to procedures and within reasonable frameworks.”So, while there has been tremendous progress, there is much more growth to be had in the country for this particular sector. And it takes initiative from different individuals and professionals who have been trained and who have the passion to create a more sustainable developmental environment for both investors and customers.
Hausples.com.pg Releases 2017 Real Estate Sentiment Survey Results
Hausples.com.pg Releases 2017 Real Estate Sentiment Survey Results
June 22, 2022, 1:39 a.m.
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Click to download the full report  Hausples.com.pg, Papua New Guinea’s leading real estate portal, is excited to share the results of the 2017 Real Estate Consumer Sentiment Survey. The survey sheds light on crucial information vital for property industry professionals such as Government authorities, developers, investors, insurers, financial institutions, personal home hunters, and real estate agents. The survey was distributed over various digital and physical channels to over 2,000 respondents in both Papua New Guinea and globally; this is likely the most comprehensive real estate survey in PNG history. Most respondents were citizens of Papua New Guinea, coming in at roughly 91% of the total, whilst international respondents came from a diverse range of countries including Australia, America, China, Philippines, and Malaysia.Survey respondents were reasonably evenly split between males and females and ~70% of respondents were over the age of 30. The most prevalent professions of respondents were government (19%), banking and finance (13%), oil and mining (13%) and real estate and construction (6%). Most respondents lived with a partner (husband or wife). Hausples.com.pg believes the demographics of the survey represent a highly accurate snapshot of Papua New Guinea society and the sample size of over 2,000 people provides statistical accuracy of over 97%. Survey questions were divided between the rental and sales markets, financial literacy and the real estate industry generally.In terms of the rental market, ~45% of respondents are considering renting a property over the next 2 months, confirming that demand for rental housing is incredibly high. Perhaps surprisingly, nearly 40% of those seeking rental accommodation have a preference for condos/apartments, with the next most popular property type being PNG-style houses (timber framed, high set buildings). Roughly 45% of respondents are prepared to spend over k2,000 per month renting and 40% consider that renting is either somewhat affordable through to very affordable. This should give apartment developers in the capitals continued confidence of ongoing demand throughout the price spectrum, but particularly for affordable styles of housing.   Property purchase is now an extremely high priority for Papua New Guineans, with over half of respondents (55%) stating an intention to purchase over the next 12 months. Sentiment toward housing is also extremely buoyant with 61% of people believing that now is a good time to buy a home. This is despite (or perhaps even the result of) a highly prevalent belief that property prices have increased over the last 12 months (67% of people). As distinct from renters, purchasers clearly prefer PNG and Western style houses (30%+ and 28% respectively), with condos being preferred by just 7% of respondents. Port Moresby is by far the most popular locale for property hunters, with 80%+ respondents seeking to buy in or around the Capital, followed by Lae, East New Britain and Madang.     Purchasing power and financial literacy are also rapidly improving, indicating that steps taken by both the Government and private enterprise, such as the First Home Ownership Loan Scheme, are having a positive effect. Whilst 70% of home hunters intend to spend less than K500,000 on their next home, a substantial proportion (20%+) will spend between K500,000 – K1 million, and 10% will spend K1 million or more. 85% of people are prepared to contribute a deposit of 10% or more toward their purchase and 77% indicated that they will fully insure their future home.These results confirm very positive sentiment toward home ownership, the prospects for the real estate market and rapidly increasing financial literacy. Those in the real estate, construction and financial services sectors should be encouraged by these results. However, whilst there is clearly substantial demand for housing, supply clearly remains highly constrained. This is evidenced in respondent’s primary concern for the real estate industry as “land tenure and the availability freehold land” (over 60% of respondents). Indicating that Papua New Guineans are well aware of the complexities of the country’s customary land tenure system and the pressure this places on the availability of land for purchase. Hausples.com.pg notes the Government’s efforts to increase the availability of land for purchase, particularly in the affordable spectrum. There are between 5,000 – 6,000 new homes forecasted to be built in Port Moresby over the next 18 months, with up to 50,000 additional homes slated to be build by 2020. These comprise major government initiatives such as the National Housing Commission’s mega-development at Duran Farm which will comprise 44,000 dwellings (standalone 2-3 bedroom houses). There are also some other smaller private developments such as Mediterranean Apartments (48 units comprising bedsit and 2 – 3 bedroom homes), Community Housing Limited’s proposed development at 9 Mile (160 stand alone 3 bedroom houses), and larger developments such as Edai Town which comprises 300 homes (2 – 3 bedroom homes).This increased supply, when coupled with novel housing initiatives such as the First Home Ownership Loan Scheme and the National Superannuation Fund’s Housing Advance Scheme are excellent positive steps in allowing ordinary Papua New Guineans to purchase a home. It is extremely encouraging to see the present efforts to address the housing shortage. These efforts are clearly increasing people’s positivity toward homeownership, education with respect to financial literacy, and general sentiment toward PNG’s property market. All of these factors bode well for the future of PNG’s real estate market and people’s prospects for living in a home.Hausples.com.pg hopes that Government authorities, those in the real estate and construction sphere and the financial services sector will use the data contained 2017 Real Estate Sentiment Survey constructively and to the advancement of the Papua New Guinea’s real estate market. Click to download the full report
Harbourside West: Make Business a Pleasure
Harbourside West: Make Business a Pleasure
June 22, 2022, 1:39 a.m.
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Papua New Guinea is becoming an increasingly interesting investment location for business and industry expansion. But it’s also becoming a breeding ground for many emerging startups that come from various industries and sectors. So, it is typical for these businesses and individuals to expand their physical work space as they expand their network. How do you Find the Perfect Office Space?Great work spaces need to address the needs of the business or organization. Its characteristics include a safe and convenient location, a reasonable price, good infrastructure, and a decent work area. But getting these things on your own doesn’t come easy or cheap – especially if you’re just starting out. Strategically located in Stanley Esplanade, Harbourside West Tower Serviced Offices offers easy access to just that.There are also dining options at Harbourside itself, like Duffy, Tandoor on the Harbour, The Naked Fish on the Pier, and The Pier Drinking Consultants, and Sogno – So, whether you are looking for a quick bite, coffee, or a fine dining experience to woo your clients, Harbourside is the perfect place for this.What Range of Office Spaces Does Harbourside West Tower Serviced Offices Have?More than the convenient location, Harbourside West Tower Serviced Offices also offers a wide variety of fully-equipped and fully-furnished office spaces that cater to the needs of different business models – from a 5 sqm one-person private unit that costs K4,576 a month, all the way to a 70 sqm fully-equipped 12-person office for just K23,100 a month.Other options include a 8.8 sqm 2 to 3-person office for K7,436 a month, a 36 sqm 4-person office for K11,880 a month, a 46 sqm 7-person office for K15,180 a month, a 43 sqm 6-person office for K12,613.33 a month, a 45 sqm 6-person office  for K13,200 a month, a 54 sqm 7-person office for K17,820 a month, and a 50 sqm 8-person office for K10,982.40 a month.If you’re looking for something more cost efficient, another feature that Harbourside West Tower Serviced Offices offers is its K60 hot desk seats that essentially allows budding entrepreneurs and freelancers to get a space of their own on a shared office environment to easily veer away from the rush of the central business district. What Makes Harbourside West Tower Serviced Offices So Special?All the units here are accompanied with a great view of the Fairfax Harbour or the Central Business District and can be leased for both short or long-term purposes. This means flexible rental arrangements that can be done on a monthly, weekly, daily, or even on an hourly basis.Each unit also comes equipped with a set of modern and high quality desks, chairs, and filing cabinets. Renting a unit also allows businesses to use shared facilities such as the fridge, microwave, kitchen, and the breakout area. The rent is inclusive of utilities such as washrooms, water, electricity, general office cleaning once a week, 24-hour security, and competent support staff.Harbourside West Tower Serviced Offices does not claim to be able to run your business for you, but it offers you the ability to take charge and help you run your office space and environment. With your own fully-furnished work space and a fully-trained support staff, all you’ll ever need to do is to turn your business into a success! So, when work starts becoming a hassle more than an asset and it slowly becomes your life, it’s worth checking to see if you can live that work life more efficiently at the Harbourside West Tower Serviced Offices!Click Here to See all the Harbourside Offices AvailableorClick Here to Contact Harbourside!
Contributing or Confusing: PNG Infrastructure
Contributing or Confusing: PNG Infrastructure
June 22, 2022, 1:56 a.m.
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Image Source: onepng.comPlaying a huge part as a factor affecting growth and as an indicator of it, infrastructure is easily an essential element that affects people’s way of life in Papua New Guinea. It offers accessibility, comfort, convenience, and opportunities. But is the end result of building PNG infrastructure really all fine and dandy?Building BridgesLand and property prices in Siviri and Kerema may see a sudden change, following the completion and launching of the K-Bay footbridge last September 16, 2016.  The bridge cost K350,000  and was built by the Mesaivo Clan Land Owners. It was funded through the SSG Funds by the Gulf Provincial Technical Services. This project will allow locals to conveniently move from one town proper to another in order to access healthcare, proper education, and markets. Gulf Governor Havila Kavo – who attended the opening – warns though that the Siviri people who had been affected by the unusually high tides should relocate to another area. This bridge may be one of the steps for residents to slowly and easily do that.The opening of the 100-meter long K-Bay footbridge last Friday was also attended by the Mayor of Kerema Town, Jack Narrie, and Gabriel Ikamu who is the ward councilor of Siviri.Houses Built on Air?While the construction and completion of the K-Bay footbridge has brought new opportunities for locals and tourists who wish to visit Siviri and Kerema, another PNG infrastructure is causing an alarm – not because of the infrastructure itself, but developments surrounding it. Concerns regarding the Jackson International Airport in Port Moresby is now increasing, particularly because of the houses that have been popping up in and around it.According to the Civil Aviation Authority, not only is this in breach of existing policies, but it’s also dangerous for people living in these housing developments who can potentially be victims of aircrafts crashing through their property. The CAA also adds that these housing projects have not gotten any sort of approval. Some of these houses have even been built along flight paths and are causing problems as they serve as obstacles for aircrafts trying to leave and land on the airport. Any more of these developments and the runways may be rendered unusable.Korean HydropowerResidential and commercial properties are soon to enjoy the taste of hydropower as Papua New Guinea’s Works and Implementation Development Department closed in on investor Korea Southern Power or KOSPO through a signed memorandum of understanding. This is especially significant since only 10 percent of the total population have access to energy.Through this project, the government aims to increase this figure to 70 percent by the end of 2030.Linking the GapExpecting to generate around K4.3 billion, construction of roads that connect 9-Mile, Gerehu, and Hanuabada started back in 2012. According to the NCDC deputy city manager of regulatory services, Kenneth Atasoa, this will open up zoned land for businesses and commercial use. In total, there will be around 4,000 allotments that would be available. He explains that this will also open up the land which individuals and developers can utilize for development projects, including residential housing and buildings. He says “The roads have enabled rapid development and there are vast commercial opportunities to be made use of (from which) businesses and residents can benefit.”Heaps of upcoming and completed infrastructural developments are causing changes in the real estate sector, most especially in the residential and commercial market. But whether the long-term plan for PNG’s citizens will reach completion as well has yet to be fully realized and seen.Subscribe to our Newsletter to receive news and updates about New Developments, Free Land Titles News, Real Estate & Housing Demand trends and other programmes to help PNG home buyers!
Incorporated Land Group: Minding Misconceptions
Incorporated Land Group: Minding Misconceptions
June 22, 2022, 1:57 a.m.
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Image Source: abc.net.auCustomary landowners may be perplexed and intimidated with the system of registering their land as Incorporated Land Groups through the Voluntary Customary Land Registration. These might be due to either worries of the underlying costs or the complexity of the process itself. But this also might be a good long-term investment.RequirementsRegistering land as an Incorporated Land Group isn’t as complicated as some might think. Application only requires a few forms to be filled out with the assistance of the Provincial Customary Lands Officer and endorsed by Provincial Land Advisor. First of these forms is the Application for Recognition as an Incorporated Land Group. This must be submitted along with the Records of Meeting Decision Form, Certificate on Adoption of Constitution, List of Membership with Birth Certificates, List of Property, Constitution of the Land Group, and a sketch map of all the customary land owned by the group.This is the part of the process where positions for the Incorporated Land Group and designations are clarified and noted for future use.CostsIn addition to the forms, the Department of Land & Physical Planning requires applicants to shoulder the payment for publication fees in the national Gazette and Media. Some costs for the application process such as surveying are determined by market forces. So, costs vary from one application to another sometimes. But as more and more people become familiar with setting up and registering an Incorporated Land Group, fees may lower and become competitive.BenefitsThe process of registering Incorporated Land Groups under the Voluntary Customary Land Group is distinct and is specifically made for registering customary land and incorporating landowning groups. It’s one of the only mechanisms to unlock customary land and opening it to economic growth without having to sacrifice ownership.Acting Executive Director for the Office of Customary Land Development explains that “the ILG/VCLR processes are designed to eradicate land grabbing and pursue natural justice by granting formal recognition to land under customary ownership through incorporated landowning groups.”Changes in Incorporated Land GroupParliamentarians are busy promoting the registration under the ILGs and informing their constituents that a new act will be implemented at the strike of February 17, 2017. ILG groups will need to advertise in the media and renew their ILG certificates. If there are no objections, the ILG will be renewed and will be bound to the new act.Getting to know something new may be a daunting task, but it can sometimes be worth the effort as well. So, if the ILG registration process seems difficult at the moment, it may be worth noting that there may be something valuable buried beneath the clutter you can use for the future. It just takes a bit of patience.Subscribe to our Newsletter to receive news and updates about New Developments, Free Land Titles News, Real Estate & Housing Demand trends and other programmes to help PNG home buyers!
PNG Economy: Better and Bolder
PNG Economy: Better and Bolder
June 22, 2022, 2:01 a.m.
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Image Source: emtv.com.pgThe Papua New Guinea real estate sector has seen its fair share of ups and downs. But a couple of new activities in the market may be able to help stabilise its continuous growth and contribute to the PNG economy.Building Structures and Building LivesOther than the prominent use of customary land titles in Papua New Guinea, there is also an abundance of land titles that are owned by the State which have high probabilities of being turned into development areas for the benefit of the PNG economy, through commercial investments. This is exactly what will happen to a 5-hectare piece of land that was acquired back in the 1970s by the State. The project will be called the Sepik Plains Special Economic Zone at Yangoru-Saussia.This is according to the Prime Minister of Papua New Guinea himself, Peter O’Neill, on his speech during his visit to East Sepik recently with the Trade and Commerce Minister, Richard Maru. He adds that this specific project will create more employment and investment opportunities in terms of commercial investments and for small businesses. He continues to say that this will also “change the lives of many people and bring social and economic benefits to the people.”Some of these benefits will come from the different entities that will soon rise within the borders of the special economic zone such as the Yangoru Water and Power Supply, and the Sepik Chicken Grain and Cocoa Innovation Project. Other sets of infrastructure are also hinted to rise inside the zone but have not been finalized yet. This is also great news for a subsidiary of the LR Group, Innovative Agro Industry Limited, as they have been the primary group that had been pushing the government to do this project for quite some time now. Quality Products for Quality BusinessesMeanwhile, the government and other businesses interested in the special economic zone should not have any difficulties in terms of construction anymore as there are now even more sophisticated materials and accessories like the fire shield paints that are currently widely available for purchase and usage. This increase in supply and improvement in the technology of the products are expected to address an upcoming increase in demand for better quality materials due to the continuous growth of the PNG economy.All of these new and innovative products had just been exhibited and showcased at the Lamana Hotel last Wednesday by the Papua New Guinea Institute of Architects and their respective partners through a trade show that was put together exclusively for the community of architects who are based in the country. Unlike the other products that are currently available in stores and through other suppliers though, these materials are set specifically for the tropical climate and for the particular needs of the Papua New Guinean market.These materials come mainly from an Australian-based construction supply company, Pacific Islands International. They are a family-run business from Townsville that focuses on providing different building materials and products for the Pacific Island Nations like Papua New Guinea. The said products will be available through the local distributor Badili Hardware which also already has a wide range of building supplies for both residential and commercial properties.Although the event was exclusively organized for the architecture community in Papua New Guinea who was able to see everything first-hand during the event, this will also be beneficial for locals and expats who now have the assurance that top of the line and technologically-advanced materials can be sourced within the country, through a trusted distributor and from a trusted supplier. This lowers the long-term costs for building new investment properties that are required to follow certain guidelines and regulations such as apartment complexes, condominiums, commercial and industrial spaces. This will help immensely for future projects that will be similar to the Sepik Plains Special Economic Zone at Yangoru-Saussia. The ImplicationsAs more and more developments and initiatives begin to surface from the government and the private sector, a manifestation of opportunities begin to come to light as well. And since Papua New Guinea is considered to be one of the emerging markets internationally, these are definitely welcomed changes that will affect how the country is perceived in a global scale. This may one day soon also lead to policy changes that will improve how business transactions are made both in the retail and real estate sector.Though not without its own set of controversies and troubles, this is definitely a great time for the country because its initiatives are focused towards the direction of financial growth and stability. This means that there are more provisions for anyone who is already thinking about starting their investment journey, and there is more complexity for those who are looking to diversify their investment portfolio.Whatever the case, after taking all the risks into consideration, this can be a good time to make your move into the country and be part of the growth. Prices are low and potential returns are high. There is also no shortage of resources. Depending on your evaluation, it is never too soon to start thinking about your future gain. Subscribe to our Newsletter to receive news and updates about New Developments, Free Land Titles News, Real Estate & Housing Demand trends and other programmes to help PNG home buyers!
PNG Real Estate and its Current State
PNG Real Estate and its Current State
June 22, 2022, 2:02 a.m.
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One of the components to the growth of Papua New Guinea are the project pipeline and the attractive investment opportunities for investors in the PNG real estate sector. This is according to the Oxford Business Group’s “The Report: Papua New Guinea 2016.” The Oxford Business Group is an international research, consultancy and publishing firm.The report included interviews with Frank Kramer, CEO of Kramer Ausenco; Gudmundur Fridriksson, the CEO of Paga Hill Estate; and Dominic Avenell, Managing Director of Avenell Engineering Systems. From the Principles of PhysicsThe report delves what the government is doing to build PNG’s potential after its biggest liquefied natural gas development came on-stream. The report states, “Building on the momentum generated by the successful launch of the Papua New Guinea Liquefied Natural Gas project, the government continues to take the lead in stimulating construction activity in PNG, with various opportunities across the board from ports and road projects to a range of residential and commercial developments open to both domestic and foreign companies for participation and investment.”These projects include the upgrade of the East Cape Road on Milne Bay and the Duran Housing Project. Proper PNG Real Estate ManagementA fall in GDP growth rate is likely to create a few hurdles but will not be enough to deter a moment of economic transition. Andrew Jeffreys – Oxford Business Group Chief Executive Officer – explains that their “debate showed that prudent decisions taken in a timely fashion, an enhanced business environment, and a wealth of untapped resources should provide the country with solid foundations as it enters a new phase of economic development.”The report states that “with only 3% of land available to the government to build on and develop, the real estate sector in Papua New Guinea operates in a unique environment. Despite the majority of land being under customary ownership, with ownership rights held by extended family groups, there are still a number of opportunities for foreign investors and development in the sector.” Another One for the CountryPaulius Kuncinas, Oxford Business Group managing editor for Asia, explained that the opening of Papua New Guinea’s first major Liquefied Natural Gas project can be considered a precedent to future foreign and local projects. He states that it may only be a matter of time before we see new activity in the market.Want to stay updated about recent real estate trends and new developments announcement?Sign up to our newsletter!