Recent Location Guides

Boroko
8 Reasons why Boroko is so great to live at
May 23, 2022, 2:37 a.m.
Advice
It is not easy to find ideal locations to rent or buy anywhere worldwide. If you are looking in the National Capital District you may find it overwhelming with all the choice; so many price tags, wantoks and of course the road conditions you have to consider when searching for a place. We all want our abodes to be: affordable, accessible, versatile, secure and have aesthetic appeal but aside from your own yard and house, one should always carefully consider the suburb and indeed the neighborhood before you even begin your search.According to the 2018 PNG Real Estate Survey, most of you think that Boroko and Waigani have attractive neighbourhoods because the majority voted these two suburbs as the most sought after to live in. Today we explore reasons why Boroko is such a cool suburb to search for your home in.1.The happenings happen in BorokoFrom the map you can already work out reason 1 for choosing Boroko. There is quick access to many sporting and recreational facilities, fact is that the National Football Stadium, the Rita Flynn Netball Centre and Bisini Parade Grounds are all located along the same road and are an easy five to ten minute walk of each other. Many national and international events are hosted along this stretch of road.2. AffordableAffordability is relative to your income. What you find affordable may be extremely expensive to someone else and this is one of the best things about Boroko! There is a price tag that is just right for everyone! You can find apartments as low as K800 a week to serviced townhouses at K4,000 a week.3. AccessibleWhen we talk about accessibility we mean access to conveniences, access to other suburbs and also the actual driving conditions streets. Boroko can be described as the center of Pom City. From Boroko you have easy access to other suburbs, one of Pom City’s main public bus stops is here, so getting to and from work or school is easier. Boroko offers a police station, a fire station, a post office, two banks, a craft market, many grocery stores; service stations; pharmacies and other health services; beauty parlours; schools and an assortment of churches. Overall the condition of the roads and the general security reputation of the suburb make it one of the most choice in the nation’s capital. 4.VersatileBoroko is the most versatile suburbs, you can be living just a street away from your place of work and perhaps a block away from your soccer or netball club’s training ground with the grocery store two blocks away. You will find large four bedrooms houses to bedsitters, you will find daycares, primary schools, high schools and tertiary institutions in Boroko. Various faiths are located in this neighbourhood and there are just as many clubs and betting shops. Residential and commercial property, industrial and sporting facilities - Boroko has more packed in this little suburb compared to any other in the nation’s capital.5.SecureSecurity is one factor that many Papua New Guineans consider seriously when deciding where to live, this is one reason why many people prefer this suburb to live in. Considering the human traffic and the ‘thousands pulling’ events that happen in Boroko, it is a pretty quiet neighbourhood to live in. The police station located in this suburb also help with maintaining the law and order in this suburb.6. Aesthetic appealBoroko is built on what used to be swampland in the 1930s, this means that it is a pretty level suburb and makes for good gardens if you have the time. Boroko is surrounded by rolling hills, many streets are lined by white frangipani and orange ixora plants that remind you - in case you forget that you are in heart of the tropics.7.The freshest, organic food at affordable pricesBoroko has one of Pom City’s three functioning fresh food markets located in it. Boroko market is located opposite the National Football Stadium with a huge variety of fresh fruit, vegetables, poultry and at times depending on the seas you can find some seafood here. Everything sold here is organically grown, by buying here you are supporting the local SME sector and the bonus is you will find prices are cheaper than supermarkets.Boroko Market |Source: Loop PNG8.The best 'Kalsa' spotFrom early June to late September various provincial days or ‘kalsa days’; and pre-independence celebrations happen weekly in Pom City. No other province sees as colourful or as dedicated a show of cultural pride as NCD, where the cooking pot has at least one of all the 800 cultural ingredients in it. During this period people living in other suburbs have to either send word to back home for someone to bring an item or two for ‘bilas’ or go searching from market to market for their ‘bilas’. Boroko residents however can relax and take a casual stroll down to the craft market that happens every Monday to Saturday, from 9am until 4pm.These factors make Boroko one of two of the most sought after suburbs to live in Port Moresby. If you would like to see what is available for sale or rent in Boroko you can click Here. Remember you can refine your search to Buy or Rent, you can define the Property Type your are looking for and you can search for a particular price range by clicking and entering the relevant data on the tabs.For more information you can Subscribe to our Newsletter to receive news and updates about new developments, land titles news, insurance information, real estate & housing demand trends and other information for developers or home buyers.*bilas = traditional decoration or attire depending on the context you use the word*kalsa = culture
Waigani
8 Reasons why Waigani is so great to live at
May 23, 2022, 4:15 a.m.
Advice
Waigani | Source: YouTubeWaigani Suburb, or colloquially referred to as Waga, is centrally located between the Tokarara, Ensisi, Gordons and Gerehu suburbs, and sits ideally northwest of downtown Port Moresby and southwest of Jackson’s International Airport. As one of the largest and most iconic suburbs in Port Moresby, Waigani is home to several historical landmarks such as the National Parliament, National Museum, the National Library, Port Moresby’s National Arts Theatre, National Archives, Morauta Haus, and the newly refurbished City Hall.The sharp number of the population living in Waigani can be a pro or a con depending on your experience of the area. But one cannot deny the fact that since 2018’s APEC Summit, Waigani has experienced a boom in infrastructure development, thanks to the likes of: The Independence Boulevard; The Convention Center; Koura Way (connecting both Waigani and Hanuabada via Tokarara and June Valley); and,Keni Vani Road (links Gerehu and Rainbow with 8 and 9 mile); and,The Sir Manasupe Haus (formerly Pineapple Building) Map of Waigani | Source: Goolge maps1. Witness the nation's monumental eventsNot only is it one of the largest suburbs in the country but Waigani also has the most national and cultural attractions in it. The National Parliament, the National Museum, the Prime Minister's official residence, the Port Moresby National Arts Theatre, the National Library, National Archives, the PNG National Court, Morauta Haus (office of the Prime Minister of PNG) and the city’s only golf course - the Royal Port Moresby Golf Course are all within a five minute drive of each other, essentially sharing fences with each other.  2. AffordabilityIn the main, Waigani is home to a variety of property types to suit different needs and wallet sizes. From bedsitters to executive apartments, there is no doubt you will find what you are looking for in terms of price and quality affordable real estate. Prices range from as low as K600 (approximately AUD$208) through to K10,000 (AUD$3,458) per week.  3. AccessibilityBy accessibility we mean in the terms of access to conveniences, ease to move from that suburb to another, and road condition. Waigani had recently seen upgrades of roads and new access roads afford residents the ability to quickly move from Waigani to other suburbs. Like Boroko, Waigani allows ease of access to many conveniences: schools, groceries, a police station, postal services, four banks, service stations; pharmacies and other health services; and there are more churches in this suburb than Boroko. 4.VersatilityBedsitter, luxurious hotel, town house, church, market or an international sporting event - Waigani is as versatile a neighbourhood as they come. The suburb has a wide range of educational facilities initiated by private enterprises, churches and public institutions, with an array of subjects and teaching skills to suit. There’s lots to do at Waigani, for instance sports and entertainment; whether you’re an artist, an athlete, or a gaming nerd, there’s an active spot for your ingenuity to come alive. If there is one suburb that truly has it all, it is definitely Waigani. 5.SecurityIn the early 90s, Waigani shared boundaries with two other suburbs (Morata and Gerehu Stage 6) that were notorious for holds up and robberies. Modernization and a steady stream of education and employment opportunities gradually rewrote the collective attitude of the majority of inhabitants, thus, turning both suburbs into livable areas, just like any other.6. Aesthetic appealWaigani has many monuments and are found strategically located throughout the area, some in the form of infrastructure. There are structures that are graceful, symmetric and simply marvels of modern architecture; then there are also structures those that are utilitarian with carefully landscaped flower beds. and For the most part, Waigani has many mango and raintrees that sufficiently afford shades  and beautify residential areas. 7.Waigani MarketWaigani Market is one of only 3 markets in the nation’s capital that is normally active between 8am and 6pm, daily. If you are looking for cheap, organically grown fresh fruit and vegetables in a secure location (the police station is right next to the market), then look no further than Waigani market. 8. The biggest shows happen hereShow us a venue that can cater to a variety of sports and entertainment activities, and I’ll show you one that triples the effort. Yes, Sir John Guise stadium deserves a second mention, because of its location and its multi-purpose capacity. The Sir Guise stadium is usually the ideal venue for major events such as local trade shows, international sporting events, and live entertainments. The Real Estate shows from 2017 to 2019 utilized the stadium’s multi-purpose indoor complex and immediate outdoor space to that effect. Not too far down from the stadium are the  Australian High Commission, Japanese Embassy, and the iconic Sir Manasupe Zurenuoc Building, formerly Pineapple Building.All these factors make Waigani one of two of the most sought after suburbs to live in Port Moresby. 2018 Real Estate Show at the Sir John Guise Indoor Complex All of these factors make Waigani one of two of the most sought after suburbs to live in Port Moresby.If you would like to see what is available for sale or rent in Waigani you can click Here. Remember you can refine your search to Buy or Rent, you can define the Property Type your are looking for and you can search for a particular price range by clicking and entering the relevant data on the tabs. For more information you can Subscribe to our Newsletter to receive news and updates about New Developments, Land Titles News, Insurance Information, Real Estate & Housing Demand trends and other information for developers or home buyers.
untimate guide to waigani
The Ultimate Guide to Waigani
May 21, 2022, 3:33 a.m.
Waigani Suburb, or colloquially referred to as Waga, is centrally located between the Tokarara, Ensisi, Gordons and Gerehu suburbs, and sits ideally northwest of downtown Port Moresby and southwest of Jackson’s International Airport.  As one of the largest and most iconic suburbs in Port Moresby, Waigani is home to several historical landmarks such as the National Parliament, National Museum, the National Library, Port Moresby’s National Arts Theatre, National Archives, Morauta Haus, and the newly refurbished City Hall.The sharp number of the population living in Waigani can be a pro or a con depending on your experience of the area. But one cannot deny the fact that since 2018’s APEC Summit, Waigani has experienced a boom in infrastructure development, thanks to the likes of: The Independence Boulevard; The Convention Center; Koura Way (connecting both Waigani and Hanuabada via Tokarara and June Valley); and,Keni Vani Road (links Gerehu and Rainbow with 8 and 9 mile); and,The Sir Manasupe Haus (formerly Pineapple Building) 1. Witness the nation's monumental eventsNot only is it one of the largest suburbs in the country but Waigani also has the most national and cultural attractions in it. The National Parliament, the National Museum, the Prime Minister's official residence, the Port Moresby National Arts Theatre, the National Library, National Archives, the PNG National Court, Morauta Haus (office of the Prime Minister of PNG) and the city’s only golf course - the Royal Port Moresby Golf Course are all within a five minute drive of each other, essentially sharing fences with each other.2. AffordabilityIn the main, Waigani is home to a variety of property types to suit different needs and wallet sizes. From bedsitters to executive apartments, there is no doubt you will find what you are looking for in terms of price and quality affordable real estate. Prices range from as low as K600 (approximately AUD$208) through to K10,000 (AUD$3,458) per week. 3. AccessibilityBy accessibility we mean in the terms of access to conveniences, ease to move from that suburb to another, and road condition. Waigani had recently seen upgrades of roads and new access roads afford residents the ability to quickly move from Waigani to other suburbs. Like Boroko, Waigani allows ease of access to many conveniences: schools, groceries, a police station, postal services, four banks, service stations; pharmacies and other health services; and there are more churches in this suburb than Boroko.4.VersatilityBedsitter, luxurious hotel, town house, church, market or an international sporting event - Waigani is as versatile a neighbourhood as they come. The suburb has a wide range of educational facilities initiated by private enterprises, churches and public institutions, with an array of subjects and teaching skills to suit. There’s lots to do at Waigani, for instance sports and entertainment; whether you’re an artist, an athlete, or a gaming nerd, there’s an active spot for your ingenuity to come alive. If there is one suburb that truly has it all, it is definitely Waigani.5.SecurityIn the early 90s, Waigani shared boundaries with two other suburbs (Morata and Gerehu Stage 6) that were notorious for holds up and robberies. Modernization and a steady stream of education and employment opportunities gradually rewrote the collective attitude of the majority of inhabitants, thus, turning both suburbs into livable areas just like any other.6. Aesthetic appealWaigani has many monuments that are found strategic points throughout the area, some in the form of infrastructure. There are structures that are graceful, symmetric and simply marvels of modern architecture; then there are those that are utilitarian with carefully landscaped flower beds. For the most part, Waigani has many mango and raintrees that sufficiently afford shades  and beautify residential areas.7.Waigani MarketWaigani Market is one of only 3 markets in the nation’s capital that is normally active between 8am and 6pm, daily. If you are looking for cheap, organically grown fresh fruit and vegetables in a secure location (the police station is right next to the market), then look no further than Waigani market.8. The biggest shows happen hereShow us a venue that can cater to a variety of sports and entertainment activities, and I’ll show you one that triples the effort. Yes, Sir John Guise stadium deserves a second mention, because of its location and its multi-purpose capacity. The Sir Guise stadium is usually the ideal venue for major events such as local trade shows, international sporting events, and live entertainments. The Real Estate shows from 2017 to 2019 utilized the stadium’s multi-purpose indoor complex and immediate outdoor space to that effect. Not too far down from the stadium are the  Australian High Commission, Japanese Embassy, and the iconic Sir Manasupe Zurenuoc Building, formerly Pineapple Building. All these factors make Waigani one of two of the most sought after suburbs to live in Port Moresby.
The Ultimate Guide to Gabutu
The Ultimate Guide to Gabutu
May 15, 2022, 11:46 a.m.
OverviewThe suburb of Gabutu is located on the coast in the south of Port Moresby overlooking Walter Bay and Manubada Island with the Coral Sea in the back.It is a scenic part of the PNG capital and was in the colonial days a location of choice for mixed-race families. Konebada Beach on the waterfront is frequented by residents while Manubada Island just off the coast of Gabutu is a popular picnic spot for city residents.The suburb is predominantly residential except for Karius Road where a few local businesses have their premises. The road also provides sole access for drivers to the Taikone and Vabukori villages.   HistoryGabutu was – prior to the arrival of the British colonial administration – a fishing area for Korobosea and later Kirakira villagers.Manubada Island just of the coast of Gabutu used to be a gardening area for its traditional owners. The reefs close to the island were also a fishing ground for the Vabukori and Pari villagers.Gabutu, Koki and Badili were the three Port Moresby suburbs with the largest number of resident mixed-race families in the pre and post-independence PNG. Today third to fourth generation mixed-raced families with European and Filipino ancestry still call Gabutu home. Office spaceGabutu is primarily a residential area with just one pocket of the suburb allocated to the churches (Catholic Church, Church of Latter Day Saints and the Assembly of God) and a small business center that houses the offices of local business Patrick’s Transport and Patrick’s Cellars. The Don Bosco Technical School is within the premises of the local Catholic Church. ResidentialThe association of Gabutu with mixed-race families is epitomized in the size and quality of the architectural design in a lot of the properties found here. A number of these properties were renovated by the owners and are today on the rental market. In 2015 the National Housing Estate Limited (NHEL) – the business arm of the National Government’s National Housing Corporation (NHC) – signed an agreement with Korea Palace Construction Ltd and Korea Niugini Housing Ltd to embark on a K2.17 billion mixed-use land development project in Gabutu. The public-private-partnership project will see the construction of ten 15-storey apartment blocks overlooking Konebada beach in Gabutu and is a project supported by the O’Neill government. SchoolsThe Don Bosco Technical School is the only education institution that is resident in Gabutu. Other schools within the vicinity of the suburb are Kilakila Secondary School, Kilakila Primary School and the Sevese Morea Primary School at Vabukori. HealthcareThe nearest health facility is the Four Square Church-run Kaugere Clinic in Kaugere, a 10-minute drive from Gabutu. The Port Moresby General Hospital (PMGH), Pacific International Hospital (PIH) and other private clinics are a 15 to 20-minute drive at Three Mile. TransportAccess to Gabutu is through public transport (Bus Route 22) from Koki and Bus Route 10 from Manu Autoport (East Boroko). Government emergency The nearest police station is located at Badili while the PNG Fire Service station at Four Mile (Boroko commercial area) and Town can attend to emergencies at Gabutu.
The Ultimate Guide to Gordons
The Ultimate Guide to Gordons
May 21, 2022, 12:17 a.m.
Gordons OverviewThe Gordons suburb of Port Moresby spans across various kilometers bordering other suburbs such as 5 mile and Waigani. The Gordons area is divided into Gordons and Gordons 5, each comprising of their own within the vicinity of major amenities. Gordons ResidentialPropertyThe residential area of Gordons is largely located along Henao Drive, which boasts a variety of accommodation from stand alone homes to blocks of units, to lodges and hotels. The majority being stand alone homes built to the traditional PNG style homes which has attracted many Papua New Guinean families to live there.The security factor involved along Gordons is not very high as many of the residents are families whom are notCommercial properties are also present in Gordons with buildings such as the recently built CHM Corporate Office and the Datec Compound housing some of the biggest companies in Port Moresby. Other office spaces are also available for the smaller business in buildings such as Copy-Tek Ples. SchoolsThe Ela Murray International School (TEMIS) and the Gordons International School are run by the International Education Agency (IEA) international standards of education for children up the 8th Grade. In addition to those, there is the Sunny Bunny Preschool located next door to TEMIS. Shopping & DiningThe Boroko Foodworld at Gordons is located less than 3 minutes away from all ends of Gordons, a popular grocery shop for expats and locals alike offering largely Western style foods as well as the Poppy’s Cafe. Less than half a kilometer away is the RH Hypermarket, also very popular for the locals and expats alike but provides more food for the asian cuisine.For those looking for locally grown produce, the Gordons Market is the market for buying fresh vegetables in bulk, for a very cheap price. Gordons Market however is also the location of the Gordon’s Bus Stop, bringing hundreds of commuters together at one time and has had issues with petty theft across the years. For a safer alternative, the H-hill Open Market is located across the road from TEMIS and amongst the residential properties. Here you will have access to both local produce as well as a variety of seafood.  Located in Gordons are various dining establishments mostly offering the asian cuisine such as Maggie’s Seafood Restaurant, Phoenix Restaurant, Regal Bar & Grill, Kiwa Korean Restaurant and the Brown Beans Cafe.Within Gordons, various other shops are available to find a variety of items that would be much too long to mention in this profile. Popular stores however, include the Brian Bell Home Centre, BNBM Home Centre and Courts. Furthermore, buildings in the area include South Pacific Brewery, Datec, the Air Niugini Head Office and A number of hardware stores can also be accessed in the area such as Plumbers & Builders and Agmark Hardware. NightlifeThere are a number of establishments that provide a place for an evening drink. Most notably is the Armani Club, Diamond Club and Club 22 in Gordons. Although these places are popular amongst locals, they are not highly recommended given the factor of security. Although all hope is not lost as Gordons borders Waigani and other establishments such as the Gekko Bar at Holiday, Lamana Gold Club and the Cosmopolitan are within 5 minutes driving distance. Basic ServicesThe Eda Ranu Head Office, the State Owned Entity responsible for supplying water to all residences in Port Moresby as well as other urban centres in PNG.Gordons Police Station is also located next to the Gordons Market, where people can go if need be; or they can be contacted on their emergency number 000. Gordons IndustrialLocated within the Gordon is an area known by the locals as ‘Gordon’s Industrial’ Located on the south side of the Poreporena Freeway, this area, as the name suggests, is where many of the industrial dealers may be found. Here you can find vehicle workshops such as Pit-Stop, Dunlop Tyre Services, ARB and other service centres such as the Brian Bell Service Center and ESCO.All within walking distance of one another, you can also find a Bank South Pacific branch with ATM access. A 2 minute walk away is the head office for Hitron, one of the major television network providers in PNG.If you’re looking to dine while you’re in the area, a Duffy’s Cafe is located right next to the Hitron office. For something more heavy, there are restaurants in the area such as the Imperial Chinese and Ang’s.
The Ultimate Guide to Korobosea
The Ultimate Guide to Korobosea
May 10, 2022, 8:44 a.m.
  Overview Korobosea is a suburb of Port Moresby and is located between East Boroko, Kirakira village and the Two Mile Hill area. It is predominantly a residential area and within the vicinity of public and private health service providers such as the Port Moresby General Hospital (PMGH) and the Pacific International Hospital (PIH). Most properties in Korobosea were previously government-owned medium to high cost covenant housing, which were later sold to the tenants (public servants) or ended up in private ownership through various government give-away schemes. The nearest large supermarket is the Supa Value Stoa (SVS) next to the PNG Defence Force headquarters at Murray Barracks. There are smaller shops located at China Town in East Boroko. A privately-run public transport system connects Korobosea with East Boroko, the Boroko commercial area and the Port Moresby CBD through Two Mile Hill.   History The suburb is named after Korobosea, a large village whose inhabitants the Motu-Koitabu are considered the traditional landowners of Port Moresby. Korobosea, located on a hill overlooking Joyce Bay and Walter Bay, was the first village for the indigenous population in the area. Over the years some villagers left Korobosea and moved to the foot of the hill to establish what is now called Kirakira. Mahuru village, which can be found between Korobosea and Kirakira villages, is an offshoot of Kirakira village.   The descendants of the original settlers of Korobosea can still be found living at the site of the old village and have a population of about 1000 people.   Residential An increasing number of owners of what was previously government-owned medium to high-cost covenant housing have reinvested in their properties and are now putting them up for rent. The close proximity of Korobosea to Port Moresby’s two large health service providers and the Boroko commercial area make it an attractive location for working-class Papua New Guineans who want to rent.   Schools Korobosea is home to the International Education Agency (IEA)-run Korobosea International School. Other schools in close proximity to the suburb include the Port Moresby Grammar School, Port Moresby International School (POMIS), Kilakila Secondary School (close to Kirakira village) and the Ted Diro Primary School at Murray Barracks.   Healthcare On top of the services offered by the PIH and PMGH, there are other healthcare providers in the area. These are Paradise Private Hospital, 2K Medical Centre, Korobosea Clinic, and the University of PNG School of Medicine and Health Sciences dental clinic. The UPNG School of Medicine and Health Sciences is next to the PMGH and trains PNG’s doctors.   Emergency The Port Moresby police metropolitan command is stationed at the Boroko commercial area and is a 10-minute drive from Korobosea. Adjacent to the Boroko police station is a PNG Fire Service station, which can respond to emergencies within the community.
boroko
The Ultimate Guide to Boroko
May 11, 2022, 8:26 a.m.
From the laid back surrounding of Jacksons Airport to one of three bustling city suburbs of Port Moresby, equal in standing with its own unique scene, attraction, and history, get to know Port Moresby and its diverse ethnicity with Boroko as your starting point.You may find it overwhelming with all the choices; so many price tags, wantoks and of course the road conditions, whether it’s accommodation to rent or buy. We all want our abodes to be effectively affordable, accessible, versatile, secure and have aesthetic appeal, followed by carefully considering the suburb and indeed the neighborhood in a city like Port Moresby, before you even begin your search.According to the 2020 PNG Real Estate Survey, both Boroko and Waigani turned out to be the most of attractive neighbourhoods to live in. With a past as memorable as the red, white and black colors of the Papua New Guinea's flag, Boroko was once the epicenter of Port Moresby’s city life between the ‘80s and ‘90s. The suburb, though it has lost most of its appeal to Waigani’s Vision City Mega Mall, it has come a long way to maintaining its dignity as a livable suburb to date.Let’s consider some reasons why Boroko remains a highly sought after suburb to live in:1.The happening in BorokoUsing a map, you can easily figure out why this particular suburb is one of the highly sought-after suburbs in Port Moresby, provided you know what you’re looking for. Major sporting facilities such as the National Football Stadium, the Rita Flynn Netball Courts and Bisini Soccer Grounds are found here, just minutes apart from each other. These facilities also play host to many international sporting events.2. AffordableAffordability is relative to your income. What you find affordable may be extremely expensive to someone else, and this is one of the best things about Boroko! There is a price tag that is just right for everyone! You can find apartments as low as K800 a week to serviced townhouses at K4,000 a week, and more.3. AccessibleWhen we talk about accessibility, we mean access to conveniences, access to other suburbs and also the actual driving conditions of the streets. Boroko can be described as the center of Pom City.From Boroko you have easy access to other suburbs, one of Pom City’s main public bus stops is here, so getting to and from work or school is easier. Boroko offers a police station, a fire station, a post office, two banks, a craft market, many grocery stores; service stations; pharmacies and other health services; beauty parlours; schools and an assortment of churches.Overall the condition of the roads and the general security reputation of the suburb make it one of the best choices in the nation’s capital. 4.VersatilityBoroko is the most versatile suburb you can expect to live in. it can be a short stroll from your residence, training grounds or shopping intentions. From bedsitters to daycares to educational institutions of all intents and purposes, can be found in this suburb.Various denominations are also present in this neighbourhood, as well as there are clubs and betting shops to choose from. Even with both residential and commercial properties, and not to mention industrial and sporting facilities, Boroko has quite an offering compared to competing, eclectic suburbs in the nation’s capital.5.Secure Security is one factor that many Papua New Guineans consider seriously when deciding where to live, and this is one reason why many people prefer to live in Boroko. Despite the area’s notoriety for prostitution and petty crimes, it is generally a quiet neighbourhood to live in. The police station located in this suburb also helps with maintaining the law and order, not only in this part of the city but right throughout Port Moresby..6. Aesthetic appealBoroko is built on what used to be swampland in the 1930s, meaning that the actual land is sustainably rich and makes for pretty good gardens, if you have the time. The suburb is surrounded by rolling hills, and numerous streets that are outlined by white frangipani and orange ixora plants that remind you - in case you forget - that you are in the heart of the tropics.7.The freshest, organic food at affordable pricesIn terms of fresh organic foods, Boroko has one of Port Moresby’s three major fresh food produce markets. Boroko market is located opposite the National Football Stadium with a huge variety of fresh fruit, vegetables, poultry and at times, depending on the weather, seafood. Boroko market is another wading pool of the local SMEs, and one of many areas within the city where you can actually support and promote local produce. 8.The best 'Kalsa' spotThere was a time when between every June and September, Port Moresby had weekly pre-independence and provincial day celebrations.No other province sees as colourful or as dedicated a show of cultural pride as than NCD, where the cooking pot had at least one of the 800 cultural ingredients. During this period, people living in other suburbs have to either send word to back home for someone to bring an item or two for ‘bilas’, or go searching the markets for these ornaments. Boroko residents, however, had one of two things to make the most of: unwind at home or take a casual stroll down to the craft market that happened every Monday to Saturday, from 9am to 4pm.
The Ultimate Guide to Lae
The Ultimate Guide to Lae
May 9, 2022, 6:33 a.m.
OverviewLae is the capital of Morobe Province, and the second largest city in Papua New Guinea. It is situated on the northern coast of the Huon Gulf Peninsula, within close proximity to the Markham Delta. The city is considered as the industrial axis of Papua New Guinea, because it has more industrial capacity than both Port Moresby and Mount Hagen combined. The city of Lae retains an impressive internal road network, serving the logistics needs of both Madang Province and the Highlands Highway, which significantly stretches up to 700km.The official population of Lae City, based on data compiled by the PNG National Statistical Office, continues past 148,934 to date, which is inclusive of its 11 suburbs: Bumayong, Bugandi, Chinatown, Dowsett, Eriku, Malahang, Taraka, Tent City, Voco Point, 3 Mile and 6 Mile. The traditional custodians of the greater Lae area are the Butibam and Kamkumung villages, who happen to be the first inhabitants of the land that is currently Lae city. However, the battle for land ownership between the two villages has been ongoing since the colonial days. Lae was built on the back of the Wau-Bulolo gold rush, with prospectors and miners using Lae airstrip as the transport hub to fly equipment to the fields, during the 1920s. The town grew as miners flew in from around the world with the Morobe Goldfield, at one point,  hosting 700 expatriates and over 6000 local miners. Overtime, Lae city developed into both a major cargo port and manufacturing base in PNG, with almost 20 foreign and locally-owned companies operating alongside each other.In the years that followed, more established routes were developed and penetrated throughout much of Lae, allowing stories and histories to be told and retold as the city matured. It was not until 2014 when a mammoth plan for development was forecasted by the Asian Development Bank for the Lae wharf, named as the ‘Lae Port Development Project’, which amounted to a hefty sum of $390 million.Upon project completion, the wharf had an additional 250 meters spread on top of an  existing base of 600 meters, purported to ease shipping congestion.Being the industrial axis of Papua New Guinea, Lae became an important point of entry to the Highlands region, resulting in a revitalised economy that stemmed from major sectors such as distribution, manufacturing, fisheries, mining and agriculture gaining strength. HistoryLae was established as a township in 1900 when German traders set up a branch of what was then known as the New Guinea Company in Lae.German missionaries arrived in numbers between 1915 and 1919 at the Territory of New Guinea, which was administered by the Germans and was later handed over to Australia, following the defeat of Germany in World War I. Missionaries from the Lutheran Church later settled in Lae and have had a profound effect on the lives of Lae residents and the province’s population since. The town eventually came under the Australian colonial administration following World War I.However, not much of a development was seen other than a police station and an administration center, until the Wau-Bulolo gold rush in 1926.In 1941, the Australian government chose Lae as the new capital of the Territory of New Guinea following the 1937 volcanic eruption in Rabaul. But the status-change wasn’t effective immediately, as the region came under fire from World War II, largely due to the invading Japanese Imperial Forces, who went on to occupy the township together with Salamaua; both areas were then turned into major Japanese bases on the island of New Guinea. Following defeats at Kokoda Track, Guna and Wau, the Japanese retreated to Lae and Salamaua, where they made a last stand that saw weeks of fierce fighting, before succumbing to defeat in September 1943. The Australian colonial administration founded Lae’s local government in 1971, followed by the proclamation of Lae as a city in 1972. Between 1978 and ‘79 – backing the establishment of the Morobe provincial government – the Lae City Interim Authority was created under the Development Authority Act 1981. The city authority became the Lae Urban Local-Level Government Council in 1997, as a patronage to the National Government’s provincial and local-level government reforms. EconomyLae’s economy relies heavily on the distribution, manufacturing, fisheries, mining and agriculture sectors, thanks to its strategic location as the gateway to the Highlands region, as well as its establishment on the northern coast of PNG, which links up with other provinces in the Mamose and New Guinea Islands regions. The completion of the ADB-funded project was ensured through an investment by the then National Government, that was worth K250 million. The project was aimed at rehabilitating Lae’s major roads between 2013 and 2016, alongside the construction of a four-lane highway, to link both Lae and Nadzab and succinctly resuscitate the city’s private sector. The redevelopment of the Nadzab airport in 2018, came in at a whopping K600 million, a project funded by the Japanese government at that time. The scope of the project was to allow for an increase in air traffic to Lae and Morobe Province following its commissioning. Some of the large businesses currently based in Lae include: Paradise Foods Limited, Halla Cement, HBS PNG Limited, iPi Group, Trukai Rice, SP Brewery, Bismark Maritime, South Pacific Steel, Papindo Group of Companies, Prima Small Goods, Lae Biscuit Company, Citylink Motel, MMK Transport, Barlow Industries Ltd, Mapai Transport, PNG Metal Fabricators and Homestate Cooperation. Having already benefited from the construction phase of the $19 billion ExxonMobil-led PNG LNG project, as the city had produced and transported thousands of tons of goods to service the project site in the Highlands, putting Lae in the box seat to capitalize on the extractive industry. The Wafi-Golpu gold and copper project, situated approximately 65km south-west of Lae, was the brainchild of Newcrest Mining Limited, who  came off a K12.7 billion investment. InfrastructureTransportHealthcareUtilities TransporLae’s Nadzab Airport is a 30-40 minute drive from the city, and is the key link by air between Morobe province and other major centers throughout PNG. The national carrier, Air Niugini, offers daily air services to Lae and other townships from Port Moresby. PNG Air, a third level airline company, also frequents this route out of Port Moresby.On land, the National Government is responsible for maintaining a 137km stretch of road, comprising Independence Drive, Markham Road, and the Milford Haven Road. The other remaining portions are the sole responsibility of Lae City Council.The National Government, that time, invested K250 million between 2013 and 2016 to restore the city’s road infrastructure, which saw most of them resealed. In addition, a four-lane highway was constructed to ease the traffic congestion that occurs between Lae and the Nadzab Airport. Work began that year (2018) to redevelop and upgrade the Nadzab airport, which was planned to receive international flights, presumably overseen by the Japanese government, back then.Healthcare The Angau Memorial Hospital is a publicly-funded health institution that also provides a 24-hour emergency service as well as houses the National Cancer Center. Other healthcare providers include the Lae International Hospital, Eriku Medical Center and Dr Garap’s Clinic.Water supplyGovernment-owned utility company, Water PNG Ltd, manages Lae City’s water supply and sanitation services to the residents. Water quality is guided by the World Health Organization (WHO) Drinking Water Quality Guidelines. Water PNG is also responsible for the city’s sewage and the main water catchments throughout the region. ShoppingCurrently, Lae is experiencing a surge in department and hardware stores, banks, travel agencies and a plethora of small shops and business owners. The major players in this regard include the likes of Papindo Lae Toptown Shopping Centre, Papindo Supermarket, Lae Plaza, and Brian Bell Plaza. Educational institutionsThe Papua New Guinea University of Technology (UNITECH) leads education service providers in Lae and offers both undergraduate and postgraduate programs to both local and international students. Other tertiary education institutions include the Lae Technical College, one of the largest in the country that offers polytechnic certificate and diploma courses, and others such as The International School of Lae, Busu Secondary School and Coronation College.  LifestyleLifestyle in Lae City is slightly different compared to Port Moresby, basically in terms of dressing, behaviour and local expressions. Everything else has striking similarities. What you experience in Port Moresby you can expect the same in Lae. The only exceptions are the terrain, area development and geography.Generally, the city of Lae is at the epicenter of several villages, thus the overall lifestyle borders on three-quarter traditional and one quarter Western culture.Safety And SecurityLike Port Moresby, and everywhere else within PNG, taking precautions when out and about is your number one ally at this juncture. As we’ve mentioned whilst in Port Moresby, the gap between the haves and have-nots continue to widen, so be cautious when using your new iPhone, opening your cash-filled wallet, or changing the lenses of your new DSLR camera in public. In public transport, make sure you shut the windows, or if you prefer to enjoy the breeze, keep your phone, camera or wallet in your bag always. The chances of your valuables being snatched through the window are ridiculously high. This also goes for open car windows and even if you're cycling. It all goes back to the idea of always being aware of your surroundings.If someone approaches you and demands your belongings, hand them over. No matter how tough you are, they could be carrying anything and your possessions are not worth your life.If you've planned ahead and have electronic copies of your passport and essential phone numbers (insurance claims number, friends or family contacts, bank number to cancel cards) then you're already landing on your feet.EmergencyLet’s hope that nothing bad ever happens to you while in Lae. But f you need to phone the emergency services, keep this in mind:Lae’s police division is considered the most proactive and community-focused disciplinary force PNG has to offer. Lae’s police force is currently in a partnership with the local mobile phone operator, Digicel, to maintain the initiative behind its local emergency toll free number: +675 7090 3300. Police emergencies can still be contacted through a landline on: +675 473 5401.
Port Moresby Aerials Hausples
The Ultimate Guide to Port Moresby
May 17, 2022, 7:19 p.m.
Port Moresby OverviewPort Moresby, the capital of Papua New Guinea and often called by its abbreviation POM or POM City, is presumed to be the largest city in the South Pacific, with an estimated 2020 population of just over 400,000, and distributed over a surface area of 240 kilometers, which roughly represents 1,500 residents per square kilometer. The City of Port Moresby is found on the island of New Guinea, a landmass shared with Indonesia, and lies south-east of the coast of the Papuan Peninsula, to which it significantly outlines the shores of the Gulf of Papua. Early HistoryPort Moresby sits on traditional land largely owned by the Motu-Koitabu people, who were mostly hunters, gatherers and seafarers, that normally traded with other indigenous communities - through the barter system - in the Gulf of Papua (Gulf Province today). Following Captain John Moresby’s proclamation of the land as British Empire-owned in 1873, the Queensland State of Australia annexed Papua 10 years later and declared it British-owned. In 1945, the United Nations merged the two territories into a trusteeship of Australia. The Territory of Papua and New Guinea had its first general election for its House of Assembly in 1964, preceding subsequent polls in 1968 and 72. In December 1973, the territory was granted self-governance and gained independence from Australia, in September of 1975.After independence After independence, Port Moresby became the seat of government and an important hub for the private sector in the post-independence period.The expansion of the PNG economy – thanks to a thriving extractive industry – triggered  a much needed growth for Port Moresby.  Successive national governments and municipal authorities rolled out modern facilities, complimenting increased investment in property development by the private sector. Today, Port Moresby’s skyline has evolved from low-set buildings to multistory apartment blocks and penthouses.While the PNG capital benefited over the years from the country’s economic maturity, the United Nations estimated that 37% of PNG’s population still live below the national poverty line, making the country one of the poorest in the world.  The city’s population has increased dramatically in the last four decades as more Papua New Guineans left their rural communities and migrated to Port Moresby and other urban centers in search of employment opportunities and a new way of life.  EconomyPort Moresby’s economy mainly revolves around the service industry, as output from businesses with a presence in the manufacturing and primary sectors. However, these sectors do not have a major impact on the city’s economic cycle. The growth in the service industry has been largely driven by a decade of positive growth in the PNG economy, burgeoned by the construction phase of the $US19 billion ExxonMobil-led PNG LNG Project; the largest resource extraction project in the Asia-Pacific region. Construction at the project site in both the Hela and Central provinces began in 2010, with the first gas export to Japan occurring in May 2014.  By the end of 2013, the PNG LNG Project had employed over 14,700 people including 5,600 Papua New Guineans. According to ExxonMobil the project delivered over 2.13 million hours of training which focused on developing the technical and professional skills of the workers that were recruited. Training facilities run by the company in Port Moresby and the Highlands had trained over 1600 workers since 2011. The city’s hosting of the 2015 Pacific Games and the FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup in 2016 also led to a massive investment by the PNG National Government in sporting facilities and logistics to the tune of K1.2 billion. The public works programs for both international events resulted in more employment for thousands of locals.Port Moresby’s 2018 APEC and its calendar of monthly meetings culminating with the Leaders’ Summit in November of that year, were expected to create further opportunities in the service industry for local businesses, as approximately 7000-10,000 participants traveled to PNG. The construction of the iconic APEC Haus, the venue for the leader’s conference, was underway that time and was scheduled for completion in July of that year.  Property developmentPort Moresby has a burgeoning property market that has evolved from low-set housing in the early years to multistory buildings, apartments and event penthouses in various parts of the city. The construction of multistory buildings and apartments for high-end customers were previously restricted to only Touaguba Hill, Paga Hill, Town area, Boroko and East Boroko. However, property investors began moving out of their comfort zones and in search of other suburbs to invest in. Today multistory buildings and apartments can be found in Gordons, Gordons 5, Waigani and Seven Mile in a major show of confidence in these suburbs.  Hot sellersProperty and land sold in and around individual suburbs of Port Moresby especially Touaguba Hill, Paga Hill, the downtown area, Boroko and East Boroko attracted a hefty fee. The price for a plot of land or a property (including apartments in a building) located in one of the above suburbs can sell for more than K1 million on the open market. Security and increased accessibility to amenities, and facilities including supermarkets and schools tend to be the driving force that ultimately leverage increased costs.  InfrastructureThe previous government under Peter O’Neil had invested millions of Kina into public works around Port Moresby. New road upgrades, causeways, roundabouts and the Kumul Flyover which directly links Waigani and Jackson’s Airport over Erima Suburb are the fruits of this investment. To date, this investment alone amounted to K3.2 billion, not only in Port Moresby, but in other provinces as well. This was part of the then Medium Term Development Plan and the National Transport Strategy 2011-2030.Water supplyThe National Government-owned utility company Eda Ranu is responsible for water and sewerage services to Port Moresby residents. The water quality is guided by the World Health Organization (WHO) Drinking Water Quality Guidelines.  ShoppingPort Moresby’s retail sector continues to evolve to this day, and is home to some of the most impressive shopping experiences you can get. Names like Waterfront, RH Hypermarket, Boroko Food World at Gordons, Stop ‘N’ Shop, Harbor City, all make for a great place to start.  Vision City Mega Mall, Port Moresby’s only integrated shopping complex, and by far the largest shopping mall throughout the South Pacific, is another shopping destination worth your day and time. Dotted with fun shops, a movie theatre, a night club, food bazaars, and low-key bars, there’s no shortage of attractions to go around. So when you’re in Port Moresby for shopping, it’s not entirely about what you will buy, but where?Educational institutionsAs with Port Moresby’s retail sector and every other sector that thrives on progress, the city’s education system is no different, thanks to both the public and private education providers.That in mind, Port Moresby is home to such notable universities as University of Papua New Guinea (or UPNG) which celebrated its 53 years in 2018, and Pacific Adventist University (PAU), which is a 40 minute drive outside of the city.Pacific Adventist University (PAU) is a 40-minute drive outside Port Moresby and Divine Word University has an NCD campus, which mainly caters for working class students. Other institutions include the Institute of Business Studies (IBS), Port Moresby Business College, Port Moresby Technical College, Institute of Education, International Training Institute (ITI) and the International Education Agency (IEA) or TAFE College at Ela Beach. For secondary education, you have Port Moresby National High School (POMNATS), Saint Joseph's International Catholic College, Port Moresby Grammar School, Port Moresby International School (POMIS), Jubilee Catholic Secondary School, Caritas, Don Bosco Technological Institute (DBTI), Gordon Secondary School, Kilakila Secondary School, Marianville Secondary School and the De La Salle Secondary School. LifestyleWith different ethnicities, and over 800 languages, the beauty of PNG lies in the fact that everyone tends to live in oneness with each other, majority of the time. It’s surprising that though Western culture appears to be dominant in especially a city like Port Moresby, cultures and traditions of old still remain strong among the population, and is proportional to the geographical locations.With advancement in pace and culture, you would think that by now Papua New Guinea will have succumbed to the dominance of Western culture. Unfortunately, that is half the truth, as traditional lifestyles clearly exalts the topography of each ethnicity in the country. Mannerisms, habits, mindsets, and foods remain purely Papua New Guinean, although there are exceptions such as dress codes and living standards, where both have assumed an upscale trend in major centers.  Safety And SecurityAs with any country in the world, there are good parts and bad parts. Of course, crime in Papua New Guinea is no laughing matter. However, there are certain things to do and advice to adhere to, with respect to travelers to PNG to have a safe and enjoyable travel experience.Sexual violence tends to be a major issue in PNG. While statistics lean more towards Gender Based Violence, one would be foolish enough not to acknowledge that living in PNG poses a different experience for everyone concerned.As a rule of thumb, Papua New Guinea, for the most part, is safe to visit, because of some of its major tourist attractions that are rich with history and have also received world recognition. While you're in the country and decide to experience the cities, townships, suburbs and villages to ensure a footprint, 9 times out of 10 your travel will be safe.Problems only come when you’re not in tune with your surroundings, and you wander off the main streets, or end up in an alley or settlement without a local area guide. Since it's easy to get caught up with Port Moresby’s energy and vibrancy, never forget to keep your wits about you.The gap between the haves and have-nots continue to widen, so be cautious when using your new iPhone, opening your cash-filled wallet, or changing the lenses of your new DSLR camera in public. Healthcare Port Moresby’s population has access to a variety of professional healthcare providers. The publicly-funded Port Moresby General Hospital (PMGH) is PNG’s national referral hospital, and offers first-hand practical experience for trainee-doctors, mainly selected from the UPNG School of Medicine and Health Sciences. Port Moresby’s major hospital has an Accidents & Emergency Department that opens 24 hours a day, and charges its patients a subsidized fee unlike private sector providers, who often enforce a pay-first policy.Other healthcare providers include the Pacific International Hospital (PIH), Paradise Private Hospital, Saint Mary’s Hospital, 2K Medical Clinic, Port Moresby Medical Service, Korobosea Clinic, and Aspen Medical at Konedobu.  Transport The Jackson International Airport at Seven Mile is the main international gateway into and out of PNG. The airport is 10-15 minutes drive from the Port Moresby CBD, through the Poreporena freeway and Kumul flyover, and is less than 10 minutes from Boroko and Waigani. The national carrier Air Niugini offers daily services to the Australian cities of Cairns and Brisbane and weekly services to Singapore, Tokyo, Manila and Nadi (Fiji).